Tag Archives: South Carolina

Historical Romance Set in North and South Carolina During the American Revolution


Enemyoftheking resizedEnemy of King:

“I love historical romances…and anymore when I think of a historical I think of Beth Trissel. This tale was wonderful….I felt I was in the pages. The author has a way of pulling you into the story.” ~Reviewer at You Gotta Read

 

In writing Enemy of the King I spread beyond my Virginia home base and journeyed into South and North Carolina at the height of the Revolution. Enemy of the King is my version of The Patriot with ghostly flavors of Daphne Dumaurier’s Rebecca. Pleasant Grove, the home featured in Enemy of the King, is loosely based on Drayton Hall, the oldest preserved plantation in America that’s open to the public, located outside Charleston, SC:  Part of the inspiration behind the story came from research into my early American and British ancestors who fought on both sides of that sweeping conflict. One direct forebear five generations removed from me, Sam Houston, uncle of the famous Sam, fought in the Battle of Guilford Courthouse, NC and kept a diary used by historians today.

470602681Story Blurb:
1780, South Carolina: While Loyalist Meriwether Steele recovers from illness in the stately home of her beloved guardian, Jeremiah Jordan, she senses the haunting presence of his late wife. When she learns that Jeremiah is a Patriot spy and shoots Captain Vaughan, the British officer sent to arrest him, she is caught up on a wild ride into Carolina back country, pursued both by the impassioned captain and the vindictive ghost. Will she remain loyal to her king and Tory twin brother or risk a traitor’s death fighting for Jeremiah? If Captain Vaughan snatches her away, he won’t give her a choice.~
The Feel and Flavor of Old Homes And Historical Romance ENEMY OF THE KINGPublisher’s Weekly BHB Reader’s Choice Best Books of 2009 

2010 Best Romance Novel List at Buzzle
Book of the Week at Long and Short Reviews
 
“I thoroughly enjoyed Enemy of the King…the characters are memorable, the setting beautifully described…the action riveting & the romance tender…for anyone who loves a well crafted historical romance” ~Long and Short Reviews by Poinsettia
coffee time romanceFIVE CUPS for Enemy of the K from Coffee Time Romance Reviews!
 “An amazing and vibrant look into the American Revolution…this sexy historical is a must read!”  –Coffee Time Romance and More by Danielle
Revolutionary War flintlock pistol
New Release! Traitor’s Legacy (the sequel to Enemy of the King): Journey back to the drama, intrigue, and romance of the American Revolution, where spies can be anyone and trust may prove deadly.In May, 1781, the British Legion, soon joined by General Lord Cornwallis with the rest of the army, occupied Halifax, NC. This episode in history drew me and I read all the accounts I could find. The bulk of Traitor’s Legacy takes place in the Halifax area during the British occupation, and culminates in colonial Williamsburg and Yorktown. While also being adventurous, Traitor’s Legacy is more of a mystery than Enemy of the King, with spies, turncoats, a coded letter, intrigue, and above all, romance.  I am at work on the sequel to Traitor’s Legacy, entitled Traitor’s Curse. And yes, there’s a ghost. And a graveyard–also an old cemetery in Traitor’s Legacy. These novels comprise the Traitor’s Legacy Series.
***I could use reviews for Traitor’s Legacy. If you’re interested, contact me.
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(Colonial graveyard)
Amazon Reader Review by Jinny K B :
5.0 out of 5 stars A wonderful story of love and war., August 17, 2014
Beth Trissel’s latest book, Traitor’s Legacy, is a sweet and seemingly impossible romance. A wonderful read, one that will satisfy the history buff and the romance lover as well. I highly recommend it!
Story Blurb: 1781. On opposite sides of the War of Independence, British Captain Jacob Vaughan and Claire Monroe find themselves thrust together by chance and expediency.Captain Vaughan comes to a stately North Carolina manor to catch a spy. Instead, he finds himself in bedlam: the head of the household is an old man ravaged by madness, the one sane male of the family is the very man he is hunting, and the household is overseen by his beguiling sister Claire.Torn between duty, love, and allegiances, yearning desperately for peace, will Captain Vaughan and Claire Monroe forge a peace of their own against the vagaries of war and the betrayal of false friends? ~Revolutionary War flintlock pistol
***Enemy of the King and Traitor’s Legacy are available in print and eBook from Amazon and The Wild Rose Press, also Barne & Noble and other online booksellers.

If You’ve Ever Written Historical Fiction–Or Want To


Enemy of the King  3You will appreciate the staggering research that goes into penning anything set in the past. None of us were born knowing this stuff, unless you’re vividly recalling a former life. Even after all the enormous preparation required before typing a single word, more research is inevitable as new scenes demand added detail. I have yet to discover one that doesn’t. Such has been the case with my recently completed historical romance novel, Traitor’s Legacy, the sequel to award-winning historical romance novel, Enemy of the King. Both stories are set during the high drama of the American Revolution.  Yes, I studied the entire war before launching into my focus on the Southern Front because I needed to know how it all fit together. You can’t just dissect one facet of an era, but must see all the parts, or you will be like an ant seeing only the bottom of the elephant’s foot.

I finally finished Traitor’s Legacy right before Christmas, and intend to get this to my Wild Rose Press editor in the new year. Would you believe I succumbed to illness soon after? Could be I wore myself out. I hope my editor will fall all over it, but we shall see. Those of you eager to read this new story must wait until I have a contract and more information. Much thanks for your support.

Colonial Williamsburg reenactor on horsebackBack to the research. You may ask, do I enjoy these forays into bygone days? For the most part, yes. I find myself engrossed and often come across information that enhances the story, spawns a plot line, or even a new book. But there are those times when I’m exhausted and fervently wish someone could simply answer my question and save me hours of laboring to unearth what’s needed. And historians do not always agree with each other, so I am left to gain an overall consensus of an episode or the particulars of life in that time period. I also continually consult an etymology as I write to be certain my word usage is appropriate. (Image of reenactor from colonial Williamsburg)

Visiting the settings featured in my stories is a huge aid and I do so if possible. I toured all the North and South Carolina sites in Enemy of the King. In Traitor’s Legacy, the primary setting is Halifax, NC. I had a wonderfully informative tour and guides there, plus visited and revisited Colonial Williamsburg and historic Yorktown, as both locations figure into the story. Living in the beautiful Shenandoah Valley of Virginia makes these treks feasible. Scotland, not so much. For British settings, I am dependent on family and friends who’ve visited, or live there, and research. Always research.

Through the Fire cover Final4I am grateful for all the assistance I’ve received along the way. For my Native American themed stories, I’ve had the help of historians and reenactors (also for my American Revolution themes). Anthropologists, archaeologists, language experts, and the Shawnee themselves have been invaluable in my NA Warrior series. Copious reading material has been generously gifted to me, or purchased from museum bookshops, or borrowed from the library. Family accounts I’ve come across while doing genealogy enter strongly into my work. Some online sites are hugely helpful, but didn’t exist in my early writing days.

My knowledge of herbs is extremely useful in doctoring my characters, or sedating, even poisoning, them if necessary. Herbs were vital to every aspect of life in times past and the reason I give herbal workshops to various online writing groups. Authors need to know more about herbs and herbal lore to lend authenticity to their stories. Some of this knowledge is also important to have for ourselves today, and can be lifesaving.

Native American WarriorMy point in all of this, is a plea for appreciation of the tremendous effort poured into writing historical fiction of all lengths. Even shorter works require much research. I challenge anyone who thinks this is easy, to go for it, If you already know writing historicals is an arduous path, but long to venture into the past, then do it for the love of the journey.  It’s the only way I know of to time travel.

For those of you who are interested, here’s the link to my Kindle Page at Amazon. Amazon has all of my work. Other online booksellers have a number of my stories, but not all. I’ve indie published some of my titles, but many are with the Wild Rose Press, an excellent publisher.

The Wisdom of John Adams and The American Revolution


John Adams was an amazing HBO production.  Extremely well done and historically right on. This is a fitting time of year to watch, or re-watch, it.

I’m an enormous  fan of John Adams, a brilliant man, and his brave wife Abigail. A remarkable woman whose wit and resourcefulness I much admire. What John and Abigail Adams and their children endured for the cause of freedom is unbelievable. And to think how taken for granted it is today.

I rented the John Adam series from Netflix, but it’s on sale at Amazon, so I just bought the DVD.  If you’re a fan of early American history,  this is for you.  But it ought to be viewed by every American to gain an appreciation of the sacrifices made by our founding fathers and mothers.  Sadly, many people don’t have a clue who has gone before them or what they accomplished, which is one reason I wrote Enemy of the King.  That and I’m passionate about the time period. Now, more than ever, Americans need to revisit their roots and remember what this country was meant to be. We need the wisdom of John Adams.

A link to the John Adams page at HBO.  Learn about the series and the history behind it.  For those of you who don’t know, Tom Hanks produced the series, and much of it was filmed in Virginia. In my own way, I feel like I’m still fighting for the Revolution, trying to keep the vital memories of it alive.

The theme song is glorious!

*For those of you interested in buying John AdamsAmazon has the DVD set.

Enemyoftheking_WebsiteMy historical romance novel set during the American Revolution, Enemy of the King, is at Amazon in print and Kindle. Also available from other online booksellers.

In writing Enemy of the King I spread beyond my Virginia home base and journeyed into North and South Carolina to research the Southern front of the Revolution. Enemy of the King is my version of The Patriot with ghostly flavors of Daphne Dumaurier’s Rebecca. Pleasant Grove, the home featured in my story, was drawn from Drayton Hall, the oldest preserved plantation in America open to the public, located outside the city of Charleston, SC. Part of the inspiration behind ‘Enemy’ came from research into my early American and British ancestors who fought on both sides of that sweeping conflict. One direct forebear five generations removed from me, Sam Houston, uncle of the famous Sam, fought in the Battle of Guilford Courthouse, NC and kept a diary still used by historians.

Sweet Saturday Sample from Historical Romance Enemy of the King–Beth Trissel



August 1780, Low Country, South Carolina

Dreadful screeching, like the cries of an enraged cat, tore through the muggy night and into Meriwether’s chamber.

She sat bolt upright in bed. “Demented owl,” she muttered and pushed back the short lengths of hair clinging to her forehead. Her shift was also damp from tossing. An indefinable restlessness drove her as a ship before the wind.

The clock downstairs struck two.

Meriwether stiffened at the echo of hooves on the cobblestones in the yard beneath her window. What business could anyone possibly have to conduct at this unearthly hour?

Perhaps it was a courier, and perhaps he’d come before. Images of phantom horses from past nights cantered through her mind. She had thought them dreams sprung from fever, but she was much better now and wide awake.

The sound of hooves stopped and the horse snorted.

Barn own in flightShe parted the muslin curtain around her canopied bed and slid her feet to the carpet. A great golden moon bathed the room in a pearly sheen.  She crept to the partly open glass—gasping as the screech owl flew at her from the live oak outside the window. Round yellow eyes stared into hers for a split second before the bird veered off into the darkness.

Meriwether breathed in sharply. The sweetness of jasmine wafted from the trellised vine as she peered down through moss-draped branches. The milky light streamed over two men standing in the yard, their heads bent in conversation.

JEREMIAHOne man in a dark coat and black tricorn held the reins of a bay horse. Neither he nor his mount was familiar, but she knew the other gentleman well.  Several inches taller than the stranger, he was simply dressed in a white shirt tucked into breeches that molded to his long legs and met his riding boots. Shadows hid his face and the chestnut hair pulled back at his neck, but there was no mistaking Jeremiah Jordan, master of Pleasant Grove and Meriwether’s guardian these past few months. Elegance cloaked him like a mantle.

Her heart quickened at the sight of Jeremiah, rarer and rarer these days. What wouldn’t she give to have him all to herself for even one single hour? That seemed as impossible as an end to this confounded war.

Chest fluttering, she knelt at the window to better overhear their low voices.

“Men are gathering,” floated up to her from the stranger.

Her stomach knotted in tight twists. Was this nocturnal visit prearranged? Worse—had Jeremiah joined the Patriots? Her Loyalist sympathies recoiled at the awful possibility.

He’d never voiced any open fervor for the rebel cause. The neighbors thought him still too distraught over his wife Rachel’s death to take an active role in the war, but doubts gnawed at Meriwether. She had seen the flash of anger in Jeremiah’s blue eyes whenever British Lieutenant Major Tarleton’s name was mentioned. Perhaps it was just the effect Bloody Ban had on any decent person, but Meriwether suspected far more lay beneath Jeremiah’s outward reserve than he’d ever revealed.

Lacy white clouds feathered the moon as she leaned out the window for a better look at the two men. Jeremiah glanced around the yard then passed what looked like a leather pouch into the stranger’s hand. She glimpsed a flap in the center and a shoulder strap like the pouch that couriers used.

“The usual place,” reached her straining ears.

Jeremiah lifted his head and stared up at Meriwether’s chamber. She sprang to her feet stumbling back. What would he say if he knew she spied on him?

HISTORIC HOME IN CHARLESTONHer thoughts flew like quail flushed from cover. Were his frequent absences from home truly plantation business or far more dangerous errands? With Charles Town fallen to the British and the entire Southern Garrison captured, South Carolina was rapidly becoming a crown stronghold. If Jeremiah were mixed up in this rebellion, he courted disaster.

Remaining in her chamber wouldn’t answer any questions. If she slipped down the back stairs and edged closer to the yard, she might learn more. Eavesdropping on the man who’d graciously taken her in after her father’s death smacked of disloyalty, but how else was she to discover the truth?

She hesitated only for an instant. She wasn’t Captain Steele’s daughter for nothing. Mettle accompanied the name. Arms outstretched, she felt her way in the darkness around the clothes press and washstand and then opened the door and tiptoed from her room out into the hall. The eerie sensation of unseen eyes sent prickles down her spine as she stole along the dim corridor.

SMALL GHOST GIRLPerhaps it was the portraits of Jeremiah’s ancestors watching from the walls or perhaps even someone else, someone gone, yet not gone. She’d had this uncanny feeling before. It made her want to run outside, away from this disturbing presence.

Meriwether sped past the room where Jeremiah’s elderly aunt, Miss Anna, slept—stubbing her bare foot on the low table crouched in the blackness like a jungle cat. “Ouch!” she cried softly and rubbed her throbbing toe, expecting footfalls on the steps.

No one came. Miss Anna could slumber through howling wolves. One clumsy young woman would not disturb her.

full moon with cloudsWishing she’d worn her shoes, Meriwether limped to the landing. Moonlight pouring through the recessed window at the top of the stairs lit the glassy gaze of the eight point buck mounted above her.

She froze, her eyes riveted on the deer’s head. A snake—perhaps venomous—wound around the antlers. Meriwether was no coward, but she’d rather face a Legion dragoon with a bayonet than this serpent. It must have slithered in through the open window.

Strangling a cry, she bolted past the writhing mass and down the steps. Never mind that the boards creaked beneath her feet. She hit the ground floor at a run and flung open the door. She flew outside, nearly forgetting why she’d come in her haste. Breathing hard, she halted in the archway.

Calm yourself, she admonished, and quietly closed the door behind her.

Flattened against it, she ran her eyes over the yard. Both men were conspicuous only by their absence. Not surprising. She’d unwittingly given them warning. They might have ducked into the stable or carriage house, or melted away into the night, spiriting the horse with them.

Locusts droned and crickets chirped as she poised in the entryway. Horses nickered from the pasture. Nothing more.

What now? She couldn’t go back inside with that snake dangling there and had nowhere else to go except the kitchen, a short distance from the manor house. Keith Daws, Jeremiah’s right hand man, and his family slept inside its stone walls. Jeremiah and Keith Daws had been friends ever since she remembered, rare between an Englishman and a Negro.

Meriwether didn’t want to risk waking any of the Daws. Keith’s oldest son, York, was a light sleeper and would be more than a little curious to discover her wandering shoeless in her nightdress. Better to remain as she was than to try and find her way to the front of the house in the dark.

She sank down in the doorway, knees drawn up, feet tucked under the linen hem. No serpent was sliding across her bare toes. It was childish, perhaps, but couldn’t be helped. She buried her head in her arms. What a farce she’d made of spying. “Ah, Papa,” she whispered, imagining his hearty chuckle and badly wishing he were still alive. He’d been her compass. She couldn’t find her way without him and her twin brother, Bobby, off fighting for the crown.

“Are you staying the night out here, Miss Steele?”

Meriwether jerked up her head, her heart in her throat. Jeremiah stood at the base of the brick steps that led up to her perch. “Mister Jordan! You move like a ghost.”

“You rather resemble one in that shift, dear heart.”

Moonbeams silvered his well-muscled figure in the full-sleeved shirt and thigh hugging breeches. She drank in every glorious inch. The magical light hinted at his penetrating eyes and aristocratic, almost haughty nose softened by his sensuous mouth. It could be a hard mouth when he was angry, which wasn’t often and never with her; at least, not yet.~

***My talented daughter Elise created the special promo image. Photograph of the curving steps taken by my sister of the very staircase I wandered at night in the old family home place. Remaining images are royalty free.

***To visit other Authors Participating in Sweet Saturday Samples Click HERE:

ENEMY OF THE KING is published in print and ebook by the Wild Rose Press, also available at AmazonBarnes & Noble, and all online booksellers.

***All royalty free images

Why It Matters–The Battle of Kings Mountain–Beth Trissel


October 7th, my niece Cailin’s birthday, is the anniversary of the Battle of Kings Mountain, an epic conflict that took place in what is now North Carolina, then South Carolina, and one that many Virginians took part in.  Also a sadly much overlooked battle.  The ramifications were huge.  So why haven’t more people heard of it?

To quote The Sons of Liberty: “Many historians consider the Battle of Kings Mountain on October 7, 1780 to be the turning point in America’s War for Independence. The victory of rebelling American Patriots over British Loyalist troops completely destroyed the left wing of Cornwallis’ army.

This decisive battle successfully ended the British invasion into North Carolina and forced Lord Cornwallis to retreat from Charlotte into South Carolina to wait for reinforcements. This triumphant victory of the Overmountain Men allowed General Nathanael Greene the opportunity to reorganize the American Army.”

“Thomas Jefferson called it “The turn of the tide of success.” The battle of Kings Mountain, fought October 7th, 1780, was an important American victory during the Revolutionary War. The battle was the first major patriot victory to occur after the British invasion of Charleston, SC in May 1780. The park preserves the site of this important battle.”

It seems to me that a battle of such enormous significance should not be forgotten, yet few today have heard of Kings Mountain, let alone are aware of the significance attached to that name.  I’m doing my best to keep its memory alive.

Back when I was doing research for my first colonial frontier novel (Red Bird’s Song) and pouring through old annals, I continually came across references to Kings Mountain.  The battle, unknown to me then, impressed itself upon me through the pride these early Scots-Irish forebears had in having taken part, so I made a mental note to go back at some point and discover more.

I learned about the gallant, ill-fated British Major Patrick Ferguson who lost his life and Loyalist army atop that Carolina Mountain called Kings back in the fall of 1780.  And the hardy, valiant, sometimes downright mean Overmountain men of Scots heritage didn’t take kindly to Ferguson’s warning that they desist from rebellion or he’d bring fire and sword upon them and hang all their leaders––all these enemies of the King! (*Monument at the Kings Mountain battle field)

So impressed was I by the accounts I read that I featured the battle in my Revolutionary War romance novel, Enemy of the King.  The battle is a fitting culmination of this adventure romance novel.

I’ve visited the site of the battle twice, walked the wooded knob, read the markers, admired the monument engraved with the names of the Patriots who fought there, paused by the stone cairn where British Major Patrick Ferguson is buried, and communed with the past.   Those who have gone before us and all they sacrificed in the founding of this country should not be forgotten–nor those who are sacrificing now– especially with all the challenges America faces.

If you agree with me in the vital importance of remembering those who fell in historic battles like King’s Mountain, then take a moment to reflect, and never ever forget.  Without those men, and women, we would not be the United States of America.  Without those serving our country now, we would cease to be.

I’ve included a pensive, prophetic quote below from the fallen Patrick Ferguson, whom I admire, despite his having been on the ‘other side.‘  He was one of the better British officers with much integrity.  He spared George Washington’s life on an earlier occasion because he would’ve had to shoot General Washington in the back as he was surveying the field before the Battle of Brandywine and that seemed dishonorable.  I agree.

I’ll bet ‘Bloody Ban‘ Banastre Tarleton, a much hated British officer very prominent in the Southern face of the American Revolution, would have taken the shot.  Ferguson invented the rifle that bears his name and was a crack shot.  He wouldn’t have missed Washington.  Life really isn’t fair, Ferguson was wounded at the battle of Brandywine and nearly lost his arm.  Tarleton survived the war and went home to a hero’s welcome.  So a tribute to Ferguson here and a boo to Tarleton.

“The length of our lives is not at our command however much the manner of them may be.  If  our creator enables us to act the part of honor and conduct  ourselves with spirit, probity, and humanity the change to another world whether now or fifty years hence will not be for the worse.” ~Patrick Ferguson

**The image above of the battle is on many sites. Here’s one.

Come out, Come out, Wherever You Are–Beth Trissel


ENEMY OF THE KING has 15 Five Star reviews at Amazon and nothing less.  I don’t have any control over what readers leave there so this strikes me as significant, but also means not enough people are reading it. Every story has its critics.

Come out, come out, wherever you are.  But first, you have to read the book.  If you’d like to take the challenge and see if ENEMY OF THE KING lives up to its reputation, I welcome your thoughts.  Leave it a review. Normally 4.99, the ebook is .99 at Amazon KindleBarnes & Noble’s NookbookFictionwiseand All Romance eBooks. (Sale through the 17th)

ENEMY OF THE KING received a five cup review from Coffee Time Romance, earned Five Books and won book of the week at Long and Short Reviews, received a super review and a You Gotta Read rating fromYou Gotta Read, came in third at the 2009 Publisher’s Weekly BHB Reader’s Choice Best Books, and made the Best Romance Novel list at Buzzle.

“An amazing and vibrant look into the American Revolutionary War…this sexy historical book is a must read!” ~Danielle Reviewer for Coffee Time Romance & More

More On Historical Romance Enemy of the King–Beth Trissel


ENEMY OF THE KING is on:

The 2009 Publisher’s Weekly BHB Reader’s Choice Best Books and Best Romance Novel List at Buzzle!

Colonial American Romance Novel ENEMY OF THE KING, a fast-paced Adventure Romance, is my version of THE PATRIOT,  only better 🙂 But don’t take my word for it: “AN AMAZING AND VIBRANT LOOK INTO THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION…THIS SEXY HISTORICAL IS A MUST READ!”

1780 South Carolina, spies and intrigue, a vindictive ghost,  the battle of King’s Mountain, Patriots and Tories, pounding adventure, pulsing romance…ENEMY OF THE KING.

***Promotional banner and images by my talented daughter Elise!



Story blurb:

1780, South Carolina: While Loyalist Meriwether Steele recovers from illness in the stately home of her beloved guardian, Jeremiah Jordan, she senses the haunting presence of his late wife. When she learns that Jeremiah is a Patriot spy and shoots Captain Vaughan, the British officer sent to arrest him, she is caught up on a wild ride into Carolina back country, pursued both by the impassioned captain and the vindictive ghost.

Will she remain loyal to her king and Tory twin brother or risk a traitor’s death fighting for Jeremiah? If Captain Vaughan snatches her away, he won’t give her a choice.

Book Excerpt:

Captain Vaughan escorted Meriwether back over the path she and Jeremiah had walked not long ago. Yet everything changed.  Apart from the staggering disclosures Jeremiah had made and their impassioned encounter, dragoons and Loyalists now accompanied their return. She and Vaughan led the way. Jeremiah followed slightly behind them in the middle of the pack. The clink of swords and tread of boots betrayed her silent companions, as if she could forget they were there for an instant.

Meriwether hadn’t any idea what Jeremiah had in mind by way of escape, only that a way must be  found. Wild to reach the kitchen and the Daws family, especially Keith, she half-trotted at Vaughan’s side, her satin slippers wet and ruffled hem dipping in puddles along the path.

“Why the hurry, Miss Steele?” Vaughan asked as he slid his fingers up her bare arm.

She shrank from his touch and reined herself in.  “No reason,” she said and shivered.

“You’re covered in goosebumps. We can’t have  you taking a chill.” He stopped and the assembly halted as he removed his coat to drape the resplendent garment around her shoulders.

The wool was still warm from him and the tight weave had kept the rain from soaking through, but she had no wish to be so familiarly outfitted by the bold captain. “Thank you, sir,” she made herself reply.

Jeremiah said nothing. He didn’t need to. His anger radiated from behind her like a scorching hearth. “This way, Captain, please. I must speak with the cook,” she said.

“If you like. I’ve no objection to instructing cooks.”

She knew Vaughan wasn’t easily fooled, however. She must tread with care and refrained  from tugging at his sleeve as he walked with her over the brick path between the herb and vegetable beds in the kitchen garden. Ordinary things like beans and squash seemed out of place at such a dire time. It would be more fitting if the earth opened up and swallowed their most unwelcome visitors.

A gust of wind blew hair into her eyes, and she battled her flapping skirts down with her hands.’

Vaughan chuckled. “Would that it were not so dark and I could better see you, Miss Steele.”

“Would that I had a sword to better slay you,” Jeremiah growled.

“What makes you so certain you would triumph if you did?” Vaughan flung over his shoulder.

“Try me and see,” Jeremiah challenged in turn.

“Why bother? You’ll soon have Cornwallis to deal with.”

And you have me to battle before you take him, Captain, Meriwether vowed.

Tumultuous passion, pounding fear, and the urge to break free from Vaughan all seethed inside her. Like a hunted fox, her senses were heightened. The stars seemed brighter, the wind crisper, and the tang of smoke from the chimney sharper.  Pungent aroma rose from the feathery dill as the wet foliage spattered raindrops against her. Forever after, whenever she smelled dill, she would remember this night.~

***Intriguing ‘bad boy’ Captain Vaughan is the hero in the sequel to Enemy of the King I’m at work on entitled A Traitor’s Legacy.

***Daughter Elise created the promo images. The rest are royalty free.