Tag Archives: Patriots

LOVE, BETRAYAL, AND THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION–THE TRAITOR’S LEGACY SERIES


Much of my writing features the early Scot-Irish, my ancestors among them, who settled in the Shenandoah Valley and surrounding mountains. My absorption with Colonial America extends to the high drama of the Revolution, the focus of award-winning historical romance novel Enemy of the King (Book 1, The Traitor’s Legacy Series).

I have ancestors who fought and loved on both sides of that sweeping conflict. My research into the Southern face of the war was partly inspired by my great-great-great grandfather, Sam Houston, uncle of the famous Sam, who kept a journal of the Battle of Guilford Courthouse, North Carolina, 1781, used by historians today.

Stick around for a wild ride into Carolina Back County and the battle between Patriots and Tories. Our hero is the former and our heroine the latter.  Both of them bear names that belonged to my ancestors.

LOVE, BETRAYAL, AND THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION! THE TRAITOR’S LEGACY SERIES

The Boxed Set of all three novels in The Traitor’s Legacy Series is available in eBook from ALL online booksellers. In Kindle at: https://www.amazon.com/Traitors-Legacy-Beth-Trissel-ebook/dp/B01L5PSE1K

Historical Romance Series series set during The American Revolution


Book One: ENEMY OF THE KING

Enemy of the King, historical romance with a paranormal element, is my version of The Patriot. A big fan of Daphne Du Maurier since my teens, I was also influenced by her mystery/ghost story, Rebecca. Our Virginia home place, circa 1816, and other early homes left deep impressions on me.

I’ve long harbored suspicions that those who’ve gone before us are not always entirely gone.  Most of all, I’m a Southern Virginia author, and it shows.

1780 South Carolina, spies and intrigue, a vindictive ghost, the battle of King’s Mountain, Patriots and Tories, pounding adventure, pulsing romance…ENEMY OF THE KING.

“I thoroughly enjoyed reading Enemy of the King. Not only are the characters memorable and the setting beautifully described, but the action is riveting and the romance between Meri and Jeremiah is tender. I highly recommend Enemy of the King to anyone who loves a well crafted historical romance.” ~Poinsettia for Long and Short Reviews

“An amazing and vibrant look into the American Revolution…this sexy historical is a must read!” ~Coffee Time Romance And More

“I love historical romances. They are one of my favorites and anymore when I think of a historical I think of Beth Trissel.”~Reviewed by Bella Wolfe, You Gotta Read Reviews

“Beth Trissel is a skilled storyteller and scene-builder. She immediately plunges the reader into  action and excitement with a vivid sense of time and place.” ~Historical Romance Author Kris Kennedy ( for Enemy of the King)

TRAITOR’S LEGACY–Sequel to ENEMY OF THE KING (The Traitor’s Legacy Series)

Colonial American historical romance novel

Mystery, spies, a coded letter, and stirring romance fill the pages of Traitor’s Legacy. Bringing history to life.

Story Description: 1781. On opposite sides of the War of Independence, British Captain Jacob Vaughan and Claire Monroe find themselves thrust together by chance and expediency.

Captain Vaughan comes to a stately North Carolina manor to catch a spy. Instead, he finds himself in bedlam: the head of the household is an old man ravaged by madness, the one sane male of the family is the very man he is hunting, and the household is overseen by his beguiling sister Claire.

Torn between duty, love, and allegiances, yearning desperately for peace, will Captain Vaughan and Claire Monroe forge a peace of their own against the vagaries of war and the betrayal of false friends?

“I would recommend this story for fans of historical romance and anyone who likes a sweet romance.” ~By Brony83 Reviewer for Paranormal Romance and Authors that Rock

Historical Romance Novel TRAITOR’S CURSE (Sequel to TRAITOR’S LEGACY in the Traitor’s Legacy Series)

traitors curseGhostly, Gothic, historical romance novel, Traitor’s Curse, the sequel to Traitor’s Legacy, and the third novel in the series, came out in print and eBook autumn 2015 from The Wild Rose Press.

Set in historic Halifax, NC, on the heels of the American Revolution, Traitor’s Curse builds on the central theme in Traitor’s Legacy.  Both novels center around the hidden treasure collected by a band of Patriots to bribe a Loyalist into revealing the whereabouts of the infamous traitor, Benedict Arnold, the man they badly wanted to hang.

Although America’s most wanted ultimately fled to England, the treasure remained in Halifax where the haunting mystery in Traitor’s Curse unfolds.

While the historical aspects of that era are authentically depicted in the story, intriguing paranormal elements are also interwoven; among them, a ghost. Other possibilities for his presence in the home are suggested, so choose as you will. It’s kind of a mind game, but significant clues are given for the discerning reader. Bear in mind that the author believes in ghosts and cursed treasure.~

Fog, Farm, Mist, Cemetery, Tree, Wet, Tombstone, Field, Morning, Grave

 “The supernatural interventions mixed with foreshadowing are well done and believable, whether or not the reader doubts the ghostly possibilities and curses, they work well in the story … and do keep the reader turning the pages. The rapidly developing love story carries with it some inner turmoil in matters of belief and trust, but the gripping external conflicts are laced with danger and evil intent.
The story draws the readers into the midst of the fray. And keeps them there. I readily recommend this novel, “Traitor’s Curse” to anyone who wants to settle into a captivating read created by Beth Trissel, as she weaves her knowledge of the South, herbs and history into this enjoyable love story.” ~Marion Spicer

“A wonderfully spun novel that will keep a reader engaged till the end.” ~Stephanie Lodes for InD’tale

 Won Creme de la Cover monthly contest

Nominated for Reader’s Choice at The Romance Review


Follow My Amazon Author Page: https://www.amazon.com/Beth-Trissel/e/B002BLLAJ6

The Vivid Contrast of Colonial American Settings


old sailing shipColonial America spans a fascinating swathe of time–the ultimate adventure series–from early European settlements in the late 16th century up through the American Revolution. I have ancestral ties in America from its beginnings, including a Churchman listed on the ship’s roster from the Lost Colony on Roanoke Island. And then there’s the infamous Salem Witch Trials. Got that bizarre era covered, too. Research into family genealogy spurs my interest and spawns story ideas, along with dreams and a feeling of being led by my ancestors; I’m definitely inspired by them. I never set a story anywhere not associated with those who’ve gone before me.

the last of the mohicans

Many eras and settings within this intriguing period haven’t yet made appearances in my work. That’s not to say they won’t. I tend to favor the mid to latter 18th century. Anything from lavish manor homes in posh society to rustic log cabins and Indian lodges–think woodlands and mountains in the colonial frontier–think The Last of the Mohicans. March with Revolutionary War soldiers and Shawnee Warriors, though not in the same scene. Gather around campfires in jovial company, or in preparation for battle. Frolic at balls and dinner parties, whoop it up at raucous frontier weddings. Savor idyllic Christmas celebrations and run for your life during fort assaults. Enjoy carriage rides and hang on tight in wild gallops. Visit ghostly homes and search for haunted treasure. Saunter arm in arm or load muskets. Decipher a coded letter. Who’s the spy? Could be anyone.

colonial womanGentlemen and frontiersmen, ladies and warriors, pirates and redcoats, Colonial America is all about contrast. The very wealthy, the hardy and heroic who survive by their wits, sumptuous homes, the untamed land and the even wilder men who battle for their place in it. All are a part of this dynamic era.

I meticulously research my work, and think where the stories will go, but they have a way of asserting themselves. The past will speak out.

Step back in time with mystery, adventure, and romance.

Enemyoftheking resizedEnemy of King:  1780, South Carolina: While Loyalist Meriwether Steele recovers from illness in the stately home of her beloved guardian, Jeremiah Jordan, she senses the haunting presence of his late wife. When she learns that Jeremiah is a Patriot spy and shoots Captain Vaughan, the British officer sent to arrest him, she is caught up on a wild ride into Carolina back country, pursued both by the impassioned captain and the vindictive ghost. Will she remain loyal to her king and Tory twin brother or risk a traitor’s death fighting for Jeremiah? If Captain Vaughan snatches her away, he won’t give her a choice.


Traitor's Legacy resized pgTraitor’s Legacy (Sequel to award-winning historical romance novel, Enemy of the King)
: Recent Release!

1781. On opposite sides of the War of Independence, British Captain Jacob Vaughan and Claire Monroe find themselves thrust together by chance and expediency. Captain Vaughan comes to a stately North Carolina manor to catch a spy. Instead, he finds himself in bedlam: the head of the household is an old man ravaged by madness, the one sane male of the family is the very man he is hunting, and the household is overseen by his beguiling sister Claire. Torn between duty, love, and allegiances, yearning desperately for peace, will Captain Vaughan and Claire Monroe forge a peace of their own against the vagaries of war and the betrayal of false friends.

Colonial American Christmas Romance

Colonial American Christmas Romance

A Warrior for Christmas (also available in audio): Reclaimed by his wealthy uncle, former Shawnee captive Corwin Whitfield finds life with his adopted people at an end and reluctantly enters the social world of 1764. He plans to return to the colonial frontier at his first opportunity–until he meets Uncle Randolph’s ward, Dimity Scott.

Deaf since a childhood bout of Scarlet fever, Dimity Scott intends to be cherished for herself, not her guardian’s purse, even if it means risking spinsterhood. Then the rugged newcomer arrives, unlike any man she’s ever known. Dimity has learned to manage her silent world, but unaccustomed to the dangers of the frontier, can she expect love and marriage from Corwin, who longs to return to his Shawnee life?

Award-winning historical romance novel

Award-winning historical romance novel

Red Bird’s Song: Can a Scots-Irish woman terrified of warriors fall in love with her Shawnee captor?

Taken captive by a Shawnee war party wasn’t how Charity Edmondson hoped to escape an unwanted marriage. Nor did Shawnee warrior Wicomechee expect to find the treasure promised by his grandfather’s vision in the unpredictable red-headed girl.

George III’s English Red-Coats, unprincipled colonial militia, prejudice and jealousy are not the only enemies Charity and Wicomechee will face before they can hope for a peaceful life. The greatest obstacle to happiness is in their own hearts.

As they struggle through bleak mountains and cold weather, facing wild nature and wilder men, Wicomechee and Charity must learn to trust each other.

Award-winning historical romance novel

Award-winning historical romance novel

Through the Fire Will love inflame these two natural-born enemies in fiery destruction?

Passions run deep in the raging battle to possess a continent, its wealth and furs. Both the French and English count powerful Indian tribes as their allies.
English lady Rebecca Elliot, having eloped to America with a British captain, finds herself a widow. When she ventures into the colonial frontier with the militia to seek her uncle, she unwittingly enters a dangerous world of rugged mountains, wild animals, and even wilder men. The rules are different here and she doesn’t know them, especially those of the savagely handsome warrior who captures her body and her heart.

Half-Shawnee, half-French warrior Shoka, former guide for English traders, is the hawk, swift, sure, and silent as the moon. He knows all about survival in this untamed land and how deadly distraction can be. His intent is to sell Rebecca to the French before she draws him under her spell, but if he lets her go he can no longer protect her. If he holds onto her, can he safeguard his heart? With battle looming and an enemy warrior bent on vengeance, Shoka and Rebecca must decide whether to fight together or be destroyed.

The French and Indian War, A Shawnee Warrior, An English Lady, Blood Vengeance, Deadly Pursuit, Primal, Powerful, Passionate…Through the Fire~

2c646-historicalromancekiradaughterofthemooncoverbyraremonetKira, Daughter of the Moon (sequel to Through the Fire):

With the terror of the French and Indian War fresh in her mind, can Kira love a white warrior?

Logan McCutcheon returns to colonial Virginia after seven years in the hands of Shawnee Indians. But was he really a captive, as everybody thinks? He looks and fights like a warrior, and seems eager to return to those he calls friends and family.

Kira McClure has waited for Logan all those years, passing herself off as odd to keep suitors at bay–and anyone else from getting too close. Now that he’s back, he seems to be the only person capable of protecting her from the advances of Josiah Campbell and accusations of witchcraft. And to defend the settlers against a well-organized band of murderous thieves.

Several other titles are set in the frontier just after the American Revolution, The Bearwalker’s Daughter and my short story, The Lady and the Warrior. I’m at work on a third set shortly after the war, the sequel to Traitor’s Legacy, Traitor’s Curse. Onward ho. The adventure continues.

“We hold these truths to be self-evident…”


the ConstitutionThomas Jefferson and John Adams both died on July 4th, 1826, on the 50th anniversary of the Declaration of Independence. Adams was 90, and Jefferson, 82. Adams’ last words were, ‘Thomas Jefferson still survives.’ But he was mistaken. Jefferson had died five hours earlier at his beloved Monticello.

At the time of their deaths, Adams and Jefferson were the last two surviving members of the original American revolutionaries who stood up to Great Britain and forged a new government. Along the way, they disagreed as to how to best found this infant democracy, but both upheld beliefs in liberty and the truths laid forth in the Declaration of Independence. For a time, their heated disagreement led to animosity between them and they lost the deep connection they once had. Fortunately, they reestablished this close bond in the last 14 years of their lives through regular correspondence, and died as good friends.

(Image of the Constitution above)

Some timely quotes from these brilliant and vital Founding Fathers. Without them, America would not exist. If these men were here today, I suspect they would have plenty to say about the state of our nation.

old colonial cemetary“Posterity! You will never know how much it cost the present Generation to preserve your Freedom! I hope you will make good use of it. If you do not, I shall repent in Heaven, that I ever took half the Pains to preserve it.” – John Adams

(Old colonial cemetery in New England)

“History, in general, only informs us what bad government is.” ― Thomas JeffersonLetters of Thomas Jefferson

“The most valuable of all talents is that of never using two words when one will do.” (Lawyers and politicians take note)
― Thomas Jefferson

Indepenance Hall“We in America do not have government by the majority. We have government by the majority who participate.”
― Thomas Jefferson

“A Constitution of Government once changed from Freedom, can never be restored. Liberty, once lost, is lost forever.”
― John AdamsLetters of John Adams, Addressed to His Wife

“The longer I live, the more I read, the more patiently I think, and the more anxiously I inquire, the less I seem to know…Do justly. Love mercy. Walk humbly. This is enough.”
― John AdamsThe Letters of John and Abigail Adams

(Independence Hall in Philadelphia)

“Let us tenderly and kindly cherish therefore, the means of knowledge. Let us dare to read, think, speak, and write .” ― John AdamsThe Works Of John Adams, Second President Of The United States

Liberty bell Philadelphia isolated on white“Whereas it appeareth that however certain forms of government are better calculated than others to protect individuals in the free exercise of their natural rights, and are at the same time themselves better guarded against degeneracy, yet experience hath shewn, that even under the best forms, those entrusted with power have, in time, and by slow operations, perverted it into tyranny.” ~Thomas Jefferson

(The Liberty Bell)

“Facts are stubborn things; and whatever may be our wishes, our inclinations, or the dictates of our passion, they cannot alter the state of facts and evidence.” (Unarguably)
― John AdamsThe Portable John Adams

“I’m a greater believer in luck, and I find the harder I work the more I have of it”  ― Thomas Jefferson

young girls in colonial garb at historic farm“There are two types of education… One should teach us how to make a living, and the other how to live.” – John Adams

“I must study Politics and War that my sons may have liberty to study Mathematics and Philosophy.” – John Adams, letter to Abigail Adams, May 12, 1780.

“Our Constitution was made only for a moral and religious people. It is wholly inadequate to the government of any other.” – John Adams

“Children should be educated and instructed in the principles of freedom.” ~John Adams

“If a nation expects to be ignorant and free, in a state of civilization, it expects what never was and never will be.”  ― Thomas Jefferson

Horse drawn carriage in Williamsburg“I always consider the settlement of America with reverence and wonder, as the opening of a grand scene and design in providence, for the illumination of the ignorant and the emancipation of the slavish part of mankind all over the earth.” ~John Adams

“There is danger from all men. The only maxim of a free government ought to be to trust no man living with power to endanger the public liberty.” ~John Adams

(Horse drawn carriage in colonial Williamsburg)

“The equal rights of man, and the happiness of every individual, are now acknowledged to be the only legitimate objects of government.”
― Thomas JeffersonLetters of Thomas Jefferson

459505669“We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.” ~From The Declaration of Independence, penned by Thomas Jefferson

(The Declaration of Independence and the Betsy Ross Flag)

There are so many more nuggets of wisdom I could have included. And I know I’ve said this before, but if you haven’t seen the John Adams series, do!

I love the theme song.

More On Historical Romance Enemy of the King–Beth Trissel


ENEMY OF THE KING is on:

The 2009 Publisher’s Weekly BHB Reader’s Choice Best Books and Best Romance Novel List at Buzzle!

Colonial American Romance Novel ENEMY OF THE KING, a fast-paced Adventure Romance, is my version of THE PATRIOT,  only better 🙂 But don’t take my word for it: “AN AMAZING AND VIBRANT LOOK INTO THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION…THIS SEXY HISTORICAL IS A MUST READ!”

1780 South Carolina, spies and intrigue, a vindictive ghost,  the battle of King’s Mountain, Patriots and Tories, pounding adventure, pulsing romance…ENEMY OF THE KING.

***Promotional banner and images by my talented daughter Elise!



Story blurb:

1780, South Carolina: While Loyalist Meriwether Steele recovers from illness in the stately home of her beloved guardian, Jeremiah Jordan, she senses the haunting presence of his late wife. When she learns that Jeremiah is a Patriot spy and shoots Captain Vaughan, the British officer sent to arrest him, she is caught up on a wild ride into Carolina back country, pursued both by the impassioned captain and the vindictive ghost.

Will she remain loyal to her king and Tory twin brother or risk a traitor’s death fighting for Jeremiah? If Captain Vaughan snatches her away, he won’t give her a choice.

Book Excerpt:

Captain Vaughan escorted Meriwether back over the path she and Jeremiah had walked not long ago. Yet everything changed.  Apart from the staggering disclosures Jeremiah had made and their impassioned encounter, dragoons and Loyalists now accompanied their return. She and Vaughan led the way. Jeremiah followed slightly behind them in the middle of the pack. The clink of swords and tread of boots betrayed her silent companions, as if she could forget they were there for an instant.

Meriwether hadn’t any idea what Jeremiah had in mind by way of escape, only that a way must be  found. Wild to reach the kitchen and the Daws family, especially Keith, she half-trotted at Vaughan’s side, her satin slippers wet and ruffled hem dipping in puddles along the path.

“Why the hurry, Miss Steele?” Vaughan asked as he slid his fingers up her bare arm.

She shrank from his touch and reined herself in.  “No reason,” she said and shivered.

“You’re covered in goosebumps. We can’t have  you taking a chill.” He stopped and the assembly halted as he removed his coat to drape the resplendent garment around her shoulders.

The wool was still warm from him and the tight weave had kept the rain from soaking through, but she had no wish to be so familiarly outfitted by the bold captain. “Thank you, sir,” she made herself reply.

Jeremiah said nothing. He didn’t need to. His anger radiated from behind her like a scorching hearth. “This way, Captain, please. I must speak with the cook,” she said.

“If you like. I’ve no objection to instructing cooks.”

She knew Vaughan wasn’t easily fooled, however. She must tread with care and refrained  from tugging at his sleeve as he walked with her over the brick path between the herb and vegetable beds in the kitchen garden. Ordinary things like beans and squash seemed out of place at such a dire time. It would be more fitting if the earth opened up and swallowed their most unwelcome visitors.

A gust of wind blew hair into her eyes, and she battled her flapping skirts down with her hands.’

Vaughan chuckled. “Would that it were not so dark and I could better see you, Miss Steele.”

“Would that I had a sword to better slay you,” Jeremiah growled.

“What makes you so certain you would triumph if you did?” Vaughan flung over his shoulder.

“Try me and see,” Jeremiah challenged in turn.

“Why bother? You’ll soon have Cornwallis to deal with.”

And you have me to battle before you take him, Captain, Meriwether vowed.

Tumultuous passion, pounding fear, and the urge to break free from Vaughan all seethed inside her. Like a hunted fox, her senses were heightened. The stars seemed brighter, the wind crisper, and the tang of smoke from the chimney sharper.  Pungent aroma rose from the feathery dill as the wet foliage spattered raindrops against her. Forever after, whenever she smelled dill, she would remember this night.~

***Intriguing ‘bad boy’ Captain Vaughan is the hero in the sequel to Enemy of the King I’m at work on entitled A Traitor’s Legacy.

***Daughter Elise created the promo images. The rest are royalty free.

Sweet Saturday Sample from American Historical Romance Enemy of the King


As October 7th is the anniversary of the Battle of King’s Mountain, (1780)  that turned the tide of the American Revolution in favor of the Patriots and figures prominently in my book, I thought I’d feature an excerpt from Colonial American Historical romance novel Enemy of the King.  I’d rate the sample PG, but the book itself would approach an R rating.

Description: 1780, South Carolina: While Loyalist Meriwether Steele recovers from illness in the stately home of her beloved guardian, Jeremiah Jordan, she senses the haunting presence of his late wife. When she learns that Jeremiah is a Patriot spy and shoots Captain Vaughan, the British officer sent to arrest him, she is caught up on a wild ride into Carolina back country, pursued both by the impassioned captain and the vindictive ghost.

Will she remain loyal to her king and Tory twin brother or risk a traitor’s death fighting for Jeremiah? If Captain Vaughan snatches her away, he won’t give her a choice.

South Carolina, spies and intrigue, a vindictive ghost, the battle of King’s Mountain, Patriots and Tories, pounding adventure, pulsing romance…ENEMY OF THE KING.

“An amazing and vibrant look into the American Revolution…this sexy historical is a must read!” ~Coffee Time Romance And More

Excerpt:

Annoyance thrust through him like molten steel. “Oh, for heaven’s sake. So now you’re not speaking to me?”

Meriwether got to her feet in a rustle of silk and addressed Neal with a regal tilt of her chin. “I should like to freshen up. Ensign Gamble, would you be so good as to direct me?”

Jeremiah stood shirtless, in leather breeches and riding boots. A shaft of sunlight played over her father’s sword hanging at his side and the dazzling glow of her gown. “You’re speaking to him?” he demanded.

Neal shot him a triumphant grin.

“Ensign Gamble is otherwise engaged,” Jeremiah said coldly.

“I am at the lady’s service.”

Jeremiah shook his head, ready to rip Neal’s from his arrogant neck. “I shall escort Miss Steele.”

“I do not require your services, Captain Jordan.”

“Oh for the love of—” He’d had more than enough. “You are dependent on me for everything. Your very life.”

“Until I reach Bobby.”

Outrage rifled through him. “After last night! Are you out of your mind?”

“Bobby will make Ferguson see I’m innocent!”

Jeremiah grasped her slender shoulders and bent toward her speaking in a low growl. “You are not innocent. You fired on an officer of the crown, and you are not going to the British. It’s too risky by half and damn disloyal to me.”

Her lip quivered, but she didn’t shrink from him. “I’m a Tory, remember?”

“When you pulled that trigger, you joined the Patriots.”

*****

**To visit other authors taking part in Sweet Saturday Samples click HERE!

*For more on award-winning novel Enemy of the King visit my website, and explore this blog.

Enemy of the King and The Battle of King’s Mountain


Kings_MountainOctober has come to the Shenandoah Valley in all it’s splendor, a mellow month of glorious color and mountains awash in every imaginable autumnal hue.

October is also the anniversary of the Battle of King’s Mountain, an epic conflict that took place in the neighboring Carolinas, and one that many Virginians took part in.

To quote The Sons of Liberty Chapter/Sons of the American Revolution website:

http://www.revolutionarywararchives.org/kingsmtfall05.html

“Many historians consider the Battle of Kings Mountain on October 7, 1780 to be the turning point in America’s War for Independence. The victory of rebelling American Patriots over British Loyalist troops completely destroyed the left wing of Cornwallis’ army. This decisive battle successfully ended the British invasion into North Carolina and forced Lord Cornwallis to retreat from Charlotte into South Carolina to wait for reinforcements. This triumphant victory of the Overmountain Men allowed General Nathanael Greene the opportunity to reorganize the American Army.”

“Thomas Jefferson called it “The turn of the tide of success.” The battle of Kings Mountain, fought October 7th, 1780, was an important American victory during the Revolutionary War. The battle was the first major patriot victory to occur after the British invasion of Charleston, SC in May 1780. The park preserves the site of this important battle.” (caption under this image of the battlefield)

It seems to me that a battle of such enormous significance should not be forgotten, yet few today have heard of King’s Mountain, let alone are aware of the significance attached to that name.  But I am.  Back when I was doing research for my first colonial frontier novel (Red Bird’s Song) and pouring through old annals, I continually came across references to King’s Mountain.  The battle, unknown to me then, impressed itself upon me through the pride these early Scots-Irish forebears had in having taken part, so I made a mental note to go back at some point and discover more.

Enemyoftheking_w2243_300I learned about the gallant, ill-fated British Major Patrick Ferguson who lost his life and Loyalist army atop that Carolina Mountain called King’s back in the fall of 1780.  And the hardy, valiant, sometimes downright mean Overmountain men of Scots heritage didn’t take kindly to Ferguson’s warning that they desist from rebellion or he’d bring fire and sword upon them and hang all their leaders––all these enemies of the King!

So impressed was I by the accounts I read that I featured the battle in my Revolutionary War romance novel aptly entitled, Enemy of the King.

I’ve visited the site of the battle twice, walked the wooded knob, read the markers, admired the monument engraved with the names of the Patriots who fought there, paused by the stone cairn where British Major Patrick Ferguson is buried, and communed with the past.   Those who have gone before us and all they sacrificed in the founding of this country should not be forgotten–nor those who are sacrificing now– especially with all the challenges America faces.

A pensive and prophetic quote from the fallen Patrick Ferguson, whom I admire, despite his having been on the ‘other side.

ferguson“The length of our lives is not at our command however much the manner of them may be.  If  our creator enables us to act the part of honor and conduct  ourselves with spirit, probity, and humanity the change to another world whether now or fifty years hence will not be for the worse.”

For more on my work please visit: www.bethtrissel.com

To purchase Enemy of the King at: Amazon

Enemy of the King at: Barnes&Noble

Enemy of the King at: The Wild Rose Press: