Tag Archives: Winnie the Pooh

The Wisdom of Pooh


“If possible, try to find a way to come downstairs that doesn’t involve going bump, bump, bump, on the back of your head.” ~Winnie the Pooh

“It is very hard to be brave, when you’re only a Very Small Animal.” ~Piglet

“Go ahead, eat all you want. But just try squeezing out the doorway.” ~Eeyore

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“When speaking to a Bear of Very Little Brain, remember that long words may Bother him.” ~Winnie the Pooh

“When late morning rolls around and you’re feeling a bit out of sorts, don’t worry; you’re probably just a little eleven o’ clockish.” ~Pooh

“Owl flew past a day or two ago and noticed me. He didn’t actually say anything mind you, but he knew it was me. Very friendly of him, I thought. Encouraging.” ~Eeyore

“Sometimes, when people have quite finished taking a person’s house, there are one or two bits which they don’t want and are rather glad for a person to take back.” ~Eeyore

“When carrying a jar of honey to give to a friend for his birthday, don’t stop and eat it along the way.” ~ Winnie the Pooh

“When trying to ignore a knock at your door, don’t yell out, “No!” when someone asks, “Is anybody at home?” ~Rabbit

“When someone you love is wedged in a doorway and must wait to get thin enough to get out, read him a Sustaining Book, such as would help and comfort him.” ~Pooh

“Use caution when standing by the river bank minding your own business. You might get bounced into the water.”~Eeyore

“When stuck in the river, it is best to dive and swim to the bank yourself before someone drops a large stone on your chest in an attempt to hoosh you there.”~Eeyore

“When you see someone putting on his Big Boots, you can be pretty sure that an Adventure is going to happen.” ~Winnie the Pooh

“When setting off on an Exposition, be sure to bring Provisions. Or, at the very least, things to eat.” ~ Pooh

“No Give and Take. No Exchange of Thought. It gets you nowhere, particularly if the other person’s tail is only just in sight for the second half of the conversation.”~Eeyore

“Good morning, Pooh Bear,” said Eeyore gloomily. “If it is a good morning,” he said. “Which I doubt,” said he.

“It’s always useful to know where a friend-and-relation is, whether you want him or whether you don’t.” ~Rabbit

“Do join in the search for a lost friend-or-relation. But don’t be surprised when nobody bothers to tell you he’s been found and you search on alone for two days.” ~ Eeyore

Eeyore,” said Owl, “Christopher Robin is giving a party.”

“Very interesting,” said Eeyore. “I suppose they will be sending me down the odd bits which got trodden on. Kind and Thoughtful. Not at all, don’t mention it.”~

“I might have known,” said Eeyore. “After all, one can’t complain. I have my friends. Somebody spoke to me only yesterday. And was it last week or the week before that Rabbit bumped into me and said ‘Bother!’ The Social Round. Always something going on.”~

“Just because an animal is large, it doesn’t mean he doesn’t want kindness; however big Tigger seems to be, remember that he wants as much kindness as Roo.” ~Pooh

“It’s snowing still,” said Eeyore gloomily.

“So it is.”

And freezing.”

“Is it?”

“Yes,” said Eeyore. “However,” he said, brightening up a little, “we haven’t had an earthquake lately.”~

Eeyore walked all round Tigger one way, and then turned and walked round him the other way. “What did you say it was?” he asked.

“Tigger.”

“Ah!” said Eeyore.

“He’s just come,” explained Piglet.

“Ah!” said Eeyore again. He thought for a long time and then said: “When is he going?”~

Could you ask your friend to do his exercises somewhere else? I shall be having lunch directly, and don’t want it bounced on just before I begin. A trifling matter, and fussy of me, but we all have our little ways.” ~Eeyore

“Always be aware of how many pots of honey you have in the cupboard; it’s nice to be able to say, “I’ve got fourteen pots of honey left.” Or fifteen, as the case might be.” ~Pooh

“When you go after honey with a balloon, the great thing is not to let the bees know you’re coming.” ~Pooh

I like the puffy white clouds. Aren’t they… that is… oh, my goodness. They’ve turned grey.” ~Winnie the Pooh

Never trust a cloud, I always say.”~Eeyore

“It’s so much more friendly with two.” ~Piglet

“When you’re visiting a friend and you find that it is time for a little smackerel of something, try looking wistfully in the direction of the cupboard.” ~Pooh

“We can’t all, and some of us don’t. That’s all there is to it.” ~Eeyore

“Remember, nobody minds, nobody cares.” ~Eeyore

“When climbing up a tree on the back of a Tigger, be sure to find out before you start if the Tigger knows how to climb down.” ~Pooh

“When in doubt, keep in mind that “O gallant Piglet” is always a very thoughtful way of beginning a piece of poetry.” ~Piglet

We Found Eeyore’s Tree


While on a photography excursion along the back roads of our lovely Shenandoah Valley we passed an idyllic stream and swimming hole, secluded well away from pubic view. A secret place. After daughter Elise took this splendid shot, she remarked on how the tree reminded her of the one in an original illustration of Eeyore. And she’s right. Who knew? The Hundred Acre Woods is right here. All we need to complete this scene is Eeyore.

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Here’s the Original Tree by Ernest Shepard, British artist/illustrator 1879-1976.

Eeyore's Tree and stream by Ernest Shepard (British artist, 1879-1976)

“If You’ve Been Invited to a Party, it’s Probably a Mistake,” and other Eeyoreisms–Beth Trissel


Yes, boys and girls, it’s time for a little Eeyore.

“Go ahead, eat all you want. But just try squeezing out the doorway.” ~Eeyore

“Owl flew past a day or two ago and noticed me. He didn’t actually say anything mind you, but he knew it was me. Very friendly of him, I thought. Encouraging.” ~Eeyore

“The old grey donkey, Eeyore stood by himself in a thistly corner of the Forest, his front feet well apart, his head on one side, and thought about things. Sometimes he thought sadly to himself, “Why?” and sometimes he thought, “Wherefore?” and sometimes he thought, “Inasmuch as which?” and sometimes he didn’t quite know what he was thinking about.~

“If it seems as though you haven’t ‘felt at all how’ for a long time, look behind  you. It could be that your tail is missing.” ~

“When your tail is missing, Remember you have every right to Mope.”~

“Having your tail recovered is well and good, but remember that it will have to be reattached.  With a hammer and a nail.” ~

“Use caution when standing by the river bank minding your own business. You might get bounced into the water.”~

“When stuck in the river, it is best to dive and swim to the bank yourself before someone drops a large stone on your chest in an attempt to hoosh you there.”~

“No Give and Take.  No Exchange of Thought. It gets you nowhere, particularly if the other person’s tail is only just in sight for the second half of the conversation.”~

“Good morning, Pooh Bear,” said Eeyore gloomily. “If it is a good morning,” he said. “Which I doubt,” said he.

“Why, what’s the matter?”

“Nothing, Pooh Bear, nothing. We can’t all, and some of us don’t. That’s all there is to it.”

“Can’t all what?” said Pooh, rubbing his nose.

“Gaiety. Song-and-dance. Here we go round the mulberry bush.”~

Eeyore,” said Owl, “Christopher Robin is giving a party.”

“Very interesting,” said Eeyore. “I suppose they will be sending me down the odd bits which got trodden on. Kind and Thoughtful. Not at all, don’t mention it.”~

“I might have known,” said Eeyore. “After all, one can’t complain. I have my friends. Somebody spoke to me only yesterday. And was it last week or the week before that Rabbit bumped into me and said ‘Bother!’. The Social Round. Always something going on.”~

“It’s snowing still,” said Eeyore gloomily.

“So it is.”

And freezing.”

“Is it?”

“Yes,” said Eeyore. “However,” he said, brightening up a little, “we haven’t had an earthquake lately.”~

Eeyore walked all round Tigger one way, and then turned and walked round him the other way. “What did you say it was?” he asked.

“Tigger.”

“Ah!” said Eeyore.

“He’s just come,” explained Piglet.

“Ah!” said Eeyore again. He thought for a long time and then said: “When is he going?”~

Could you ask your friend to do his exercises somewhere else? I shall be having lunch directly, and don’t want it bounced on just before I begin. A trifling matter, and fussy of me, but we all have our little ways.”~

I thought,” said Piglet earnestly, “that if Eeyore stood at the bottom of the tree, and if Pooh stood on Eeyore’s back, and if I stood on Pooh’s shoulders -”

“And if Eeyore’s back snapped suddenly, then we could all laugh. Ha Ha! Amusing in a quiet way,” said Eeyore, “but not really helpful.”

“Well,” said Piglet meekly, “I thought -”

“Would it break your back, Eeyore?” asked Pooh, very much surprised.

“That’s what would be so interesting, Pooh. Not being quite sure till afterwards.”~

“Eeyore, what are you doing there?” said Rabbit.

“I’ll give you three guesses, Rabbit. Digging holes in the ground? Wrong. Leaping from branch to branch of a young oak tree? Wrong. Waiting for somebody to help me out of the river? Right. Give Rabbit time, and he’ll always get the answer.”~

“But, Eeyore,” said Pooh in distress, “what can we – I mean, how shall we – do you think if we -”“Yes,” said Eeyore. “One of those would be just the thing. Thank you, Pooh.”
~“That’s right, Eeyore. Drop in on any of us at any time, when you feel like it.”“Thank you, Rabbit. And if anybody says in a Loud Voice ‘Bother, it’s Eeyore,’ I can drop out again.”~

“You don’t always want to be miserable on my birthday, do you?”~

“They’re funny things, Accidents. You never have them till you’re having them.”~

“Hitherto, all the Poetry in the Forest has been written by Pooh, a Bear with a Pleasing Manner but a Positively Startling Lack of Brain. The Poem which I am now about to read to you was written by Eeyore, or Myself, in a Quiet Moment. If somebody will take Roo’s bull’s eye away from him, and wake up Owl, we shall all be able to enjoy it. I call it – POEM.”~

“A little Consideration, a little Thought for Others, makes all the difference.”~

“That Accounts for a Good Deal,” said Eeyore gloomily. “It Explains Everything. No Wonder.”

“You must have left it somewhere,” said Winnie the Pooh.

“Somebody must have taken it,” said Eeyore. “How Like Them,” he added, after a long silence.~

“I’m not asking anybody,” said Eeyore.  “I’m just telling everybody. We can look for the North Pole, or we can play ‘Here we go gathering Nuts in May’ with the end part of an ants’ nest. It’s all the same to me.”~

“I’m telling you. People come and go in this forest, and they say. ‘It’s only Eeyore, so it doesn’t count.’

They walk to and fro saying ‘Ha Ha!’. But do they know anything about A? They don’t. It’s just three sticks to them. But to the Educated – mark this, little Piglet – to the Educated, not meaning Poohs and Piglets, it’s a great and glorious A. Not,” he added, “just something that anybody can come and breathe on.” Piglet stepped back nervously, and looked round for help.~
“This writing business. Pencils and what-not. Over-rated, if you ask me. Silly stuff. Nothing in it.”~

I like the puffy white clouds. Aren’t they… that is… oh, my goodness. They’ve turned grey.” ~Winnie the Pooh

Never trust a cloud, I always say.”~Eeyore

“We can’t all, and some of us don’t. That’s all there is to it.” ~Eeyore

“Remember, nobody minds, nobody cares.” ~Eeyore

“Do join in the search for a lost friend-or-relation. But don’t be surprised when nobody bothers to tell you he’s been found and you search on alone for two days.” ~ Eeyore

‘The sky has finally fallen. Always knew it would,’ & Other Eeyore Observations


“Owl flew past a day or two ago and noticed me. He didn’t actually say anything mind you, but he knew it was me. Very friendly of him, I thought. Encouraging.” ~Eeyore

“The old grey donkey, Eeyore stood by himself in a thistly corner of the Forest, his front feet well apart, his head on one side, and thought about things. Sometimes he thought sadly to himself, “Why?” and sometimes he thought, “Wherefore?” and sometimes he thought, “Inasmuch as which?” and sometimes he didn’t quite know what he was thinking about.~

“If it seems as though you haven’t ‘felt at all how’ for a long time, look behind  you. It could be that your tail is missing.” ~

“When your tail is missing, Remember you have every right to Mope.”~

“Having your tail recovered is well and good, but remember that it will have to be reattached.  With a hammer and a nail.” ~

“Use caution when standing by the river bank minding your own business. You might get bounced into the water.”~

“When stuck in the river, it is best to dive and swim to the bank yourself before someone drops a large stone on your chest in an attempt to hoosh you there.”~

“No Give and Take.  No Exchange of Thought. It gets you nowhere, particularly if the other person’s tail is only just in sight for the second half of the conversation.”~

“Good morning, Pooh Bear,” said Eeyore gloomily. “If it is a good morning,” he said. “Which I doubt,” said he.

“Why, what’s the matter?”

“Nothing, Pooh Bear, nothing. We can’t all, and some of us don’t. That’s all there is to it.”

“Can’t all what?” said Pooh, rubbing his nose.

“Gaiety. Song-and-dance. Here we go round the mulberry bush.”~

Eeyore,” said Owl, “Christopher Robin is giving a party.”

“Very interesting,” said Eeyore. “I suppose they will be sending me down the odd bits which got trodden on. Kind and Thoughtful. Not at all, don’t mention it.”~

“I might have known,” said Eeyore. “After all, one can’t complain. I have my friends. Somebody spoke to me only yesterday. And was it last week or the week before that Rabbit bumped into me and said ‘Bother!’. The Social Round. Always something going on.”~

“It’s snowing still,” said Eeyore gloomily.

“So it is.”

And freezing.”

“Is it?”

“Yes,” said Eeyore. “However,” he said, brightening up a little, “we haven’t had an earthquake lately.”~

Eeyore walked all round Tigger one way, and then turned and walked round him the other way. “What did you say it was?” he asked.

“Tigger.”

“Ah!” said Eeyore.

“He’s just come,” explained Piglet.

“Ah!” said Eeyore again. He thought for a long time and then said: “When is he going?”~

Could you ask your friend to do his exercises somewhere else? I shall be having lunch directly, and don’t want it bounced on just before I begin. A trifling matter, and fussy of me, but we all have our little ways.”~

I thought,” said Piglet earnestly, “that if Eeyore stood at the bottom of the tree, and if Pooh stood on Eeyore’s back, and if I stood on Pooh’s shoulders -”

“And if Eeyore’s back snapped suddenly, then we could all laugh. Ha Ha! Amusing in a quiet way,” said Eeyore, “but not really helpful.”

“Well,” said Piglet meekly, “I thought -”

“Would it break your back, Eeyore?” asked Pooh, very much surprised.

“That’s what would be so interesting, Pooh. Not being quite sure till afterwards.”~

“Eeyore, what are you doing there?” said Rabbit.

“I’ll give you three guesses, Rabbit. Digging holes in the ground? Wrong. Leaping from branch to branch of a young oak tree? Wrong. Waiting for somebody to help me out of the river? Right. Give Rabbit time, and he’ll always get the answer.”~

“But, Eeyore,” said Pooh in distress, “what can we – I mean, how shall we – do you think if we -”“Yes,” said Eeyore. “One of those would be just the thing. Thank you, Pooh.”
~“That’s right, Eeyore. Drop in on any of us at any time, when you feel like it.”“Thank you, Rabbit. And if anybody says in a Loud Voice ‘Bother, it’s Eeyore,’ I can drop out again.”~

“You don’t always want to be miserable on my birthday, do you?”~

“They’re funny things, Accidents. You never have them till you’re having them.”~

“Hitherto, all the Poetry in the Forest has been written by Pooh, a Bear with a Pleasing Manner but a Positively Startling Lack of Brain. The Poem which I am now about to read to you was written by Eeyore, or Myself, in a Quiet Moment. If somebody will take Roo’s bull’s eye away from him, and wake up Owl, we shall all be able to enjoy it. I call it – POEM.”~

“A little Consideration, a little Thought for Others, makes all the difference.”~

“That Accounts for a Good Deal,” said Eeyore gloomily. “It Explains Everything. No Wonder.”

“You must have left it somewhere,” said Winnie the Pooh.

“Somebody must have taken it,” said Eeyore. “How Like Them,” he added, after a long silence.~

“I’m not asking anybody,” said Eeyore.  “I’m just telling everybody. We can look for the North Pole, or we can play ‘Here we go gathering Nuts in May’ with the end part of an ants’ nest. It’s all the same to me.”~

“I’m telling you. People come and go in this forest, and they say. ‘It’s only Eeyore, so it doesn’t count.’

They walk to and fro saying ‘Ha Ha!’. But do they know anything about A? They don’t. It’s just three sticks to them. But to the Educated – mark this, little Piglet – to the Educated, not meaning Poohs and Piglets, it’s a great and glorious A. Not,” he added, “just something that anybody can come and breathe on.” Piglet stepped back nervously, and looked round for help.~
“This writing business. Pencils and what-not. Over-rated, if you ask me. Silly stuff. Nothing in it.”~

I like the puffy white clouds. Aren’t they… that is… oh, my goodness. They’ve turned grey.” ~Winnie the Pooh

Never trust a cloud, I always say.”~Eeyore

“We can’t all, and some of us don’t. That’s all there is to it.” ~Eeyore

The Secret Life of Bees, errrr, Writers


Ever noticed that when writers are portrayed in movies they tend to come across as, well, nuts?  The examples are endless.  Take Nim’s Island, the author in this film is so agoraphobic/germaphobic she can’t open the door to get her mail, runs through bottles of handsanitizer, and only eats a certain kind of soup—not certain which phobia that is.   She also carries on vivid conversations with her only companion who happens to be the main character in her novels.  *Gerard Butler, so certainly tempting, but throw in  delusional schizophrenia.  And then there’s Stranger Than Fiction where the novelist, another ‘eccentric’ to put it mildly, has Godlike power over her bedeviled character who ultimately arrives on her doorstep begging for his life.  She plans to kill him in her novel.  And the list goes on.

I suppose there’s some justification for this crazy writer theme, as there’s a fine line between creativity and insanity.   And it’s not lost on me that this portrayal is coming to us via the scriptwriters, although they’re mostly making fun of novelists.   But it’s my thinking that most people simply do not understand the mindset of writers.  For example, on chat loops, Twitter, workshops…we blithely inquire of  each other which would be the best way to kill someone in a given situation or time period.

When I taught my herbal lore class last fall I received numerous queries as to which poisonous herb to use for the desired effect, depending on how fast or slowly an author wished their character to succumb–yes, yes, we’re speaking of characters–and in what form to deliver the fatal elixir, mixed with food or other medication…and should they disguise the bitter taste or will the unsuspecting victim just knock it back as is?

Writers can be quite morbid at times, but all in pursuit of our craft.   How to better persuade readers that the story is REAL, because to us it is.

The other day on Twitter I noted a tweet from, I assumed, a writer asking what was the most romantic way for a young man to propose to his girlfriend and  make it really special.  My first thought was, are they writing a contemporary or historical, so I shot back, “What century are we in?”

The answer from the probably puzzled groom to be was, “The 21st, I hope.”

“Ah, a modern setting,” I said to self while wondering at the ‘I hope.’  I mean surely they knew what time period their story was in.  But I persevered.  Being primarily an historical author, I simply pointed out that in many of the romantic comedies I’ve seen there’s a tendency for the proposal/I love you confession to come via a microphone or shouted in front of a crowd, like in a football arena.

The tweeted answer was, “Yes, I see what you mean but she’s not a sports fan.”

No biggie, I thought.  Most anywhere people gather will do. An Irish pub, fountain in the center of a town square, airplane terminal, or best of all breaking into the adored one’s  wedding to someone else just in the nick of time.

Not helpful in this situation, I might add.  Once I realized I was advising  an actual proposal, I chuckled heartily and left him to it. The last I saw a proposal at Disneyland was faring the best.

Among random tweets from writers I noted this week:  “Gonna watch Winnie the Pooh with the kids and then finish my demon novel.”   Anyone see the irony in that?   But it’s typical.   All of this has led me to my conclusion that writers have their own language–a secret life–which most do not understand.

I’ve gotta go figure out how to handle that ghost/exorcism without making it TOO paranormal.   In my latest historical, of course.  ~