Tag Archives: medieval

Furbaby Friday With Mageela Troche!


I’m glad to have Mageela and her delightful lovebird join us, a first on Furbaby Friday. I know feathered friends are also much loved, and most welcome.  Mageela is sharing her Medieval Scottish romance, Highland Scandal.

Mageela: For my birthday nine years ago, I was given my lovebird by my niece, sister-in-law and brother. The pet shop called the black-masked lovebird Houdini since she always escaped from her cage and then would let the other birds out of theirs.

Well, I call her Boobula. She is the first bird I have ever had. And I was overjoyed that I was getting a lovebird. Much like other people, I sighed when I saw lovebirds paired up. They were just so cute and romantic, looking like a heart when their heads were put together. Besides what is a better pet for a romance author than a lovebird.

Boobula is never mated so that makes me her mate, which I thought was so sweet. That is until I got to know my bird. Most people think lovebirds are sweet and lovable hence the name. Not true, lovebirds are called the pit bulls of birds and Boobula is a temperamental diva.

And I wouldn’t have it another way. She makes her demands for potato chips, steals my popcorn and has torn up all my books, among a dozen other things. But she is just feathery cuteness. I also don’t mind that when I clean her cage she watches over me to see that I’m doing a proper job (I suppose). I don’t mind that I find feathers everywhere and I mean everywhere from the pocket of my coat to the laundry. The fact that I’m calling Boobula she is something I discovered this year when she laid four eggs to my utter shock.

When I saw that clutch of eggs huddled together in the center of her house, I had to do more than I double-take. I did a ten-take. And she was such a good mommy bird, sitting on her eggs but sadly, they will never hatch.

She bounced back to her old self, which means demanding to be let out of her cage, demanding anything I happen to be eating, demanding my attention when she wants it and for me to leave her alone when she doesn’t want to be bothered.
So, in truth, I guess, she’s not my bird. I am her human and mate. I could do worse.

Highland Scandal Blurb:

How long does happily ever after take?

They call her banshee. The taunt has pursued strong-willed Rowen Mackenzie through the glorious Scottish Highlands. One man sees beyond the superstition—Lachlan Gordon. This brave highlander is the man she loves but duty requires her to wed another.

Wickedly charming, Lachlan Gordon has loved Rowen Mackenzie since his first glimpse of the ethereal beauty. As bastard of Chief Gordon, Lachlan can never claim her as his own. When his father, Laird Gordon, is murdered, Lachlan becomes the clan chief…too late to marry the woman he loves.

Years later, Rowen is now a widow and mother and her son is in danger. She jeopardizes her life and most importantly, her heart to protect her son. Lachlan is the only man who can help her. For a second chance at love, he must risk all—his clan, his life and his love to win even as secrets threaten their happiness and their very lives.

Will Rowen and Lachlan have their own happily ever after?

“Must read for lovers of all things Scottish”—Paranormal Romance and Author’s that Rock

“5 Stars”—Goodreads Reviewer

“The book has it all war, scandals, death and undying love.” —Spunky N Sassy

Excerpt:

Lachlan lingered in the courtyard. He refused to step inside. No doubt, he could find a widow to warm the night with. He just had to stay away from the Great Hall and Rowen. Damn, she was so beautiful sitting upon her horse. She was so near to him. He could have snatched her up and run away. He couldn’t go near her. He kicked at a rock. Why did MacLean have to permit the marriage here? MacKenzie Castle was fitting enough. But the lairdess had to be pregnant. Murray’s lands were just as fitting, but lacked a female touch. Och, weren’t there women in the clan? Such ruminations failed to matter. She was here.

He peered up at the tower. She was in there and tonight he would be also…unless there was an attack or a raid. He prayed for a raid.
Lachlan leaned against the wall. He straightened as Caelen took his spot beside him, as he had countless times before. They watched the castle people stroll by them.

“All is good?” Caelen asked.
“Aye. Your wife?”
“Fat with child again. She wishes for a daughter.” He crossed his bare arms.
“You wish for a son.”
“I know what men do with women.” Castle folk hurried on at Caelen’s scowl.
“This marriage should happen soon.”
“Aye, Father Murray is here. I heard about Father Sullivan.”

Lachlan chuckled. “A skeleton of a man. Why they sent that man—I do not know. He had been here for two days. He stuttered whenever Duncan laid his gaze on him. When he saw me, he looked like he smelled something most foul.”
“Women?”
“Sin, so I guess the daughters of Eve left a certain smell only priest can catch whiff of. He fled in the morning.”
“Did you really chase after him?”

“Aye, he said, ‘you are the devil’. Me and Duncan were standing like this, so I had to find out which one of us he spoke of.” Lachlan chuckled. “I ran beside his animal. He kicked his heels harder, but I stayed alongside him. When I asked him, that poor holy man paled and then reddened. He proclaimed we were both devils. I thanked him and told him I wouldn’t want to lose my reputation.”

Caelen laughed. Lachlan felt a lightness that had been missing since the wedding negotiations began. It was the damn hardest thing to make Caelen laugh.
His laughter cut off at the approaching riders. The Murrays arrived. Lachlan stared at Eacharn riding among his father’s men. Bile rose in his throat and its foul taste filled his mouth. He gulped back the burning spew.

He should hate that man. He was getting to spend the rest of his days with the woman Lachlan loved. But Eacharn, the plump bastard, was a good man. He was always in the center of a fight. He was sharp-minded and loved Lachlan’s humor. Hell, Lachlan admitted it—he liked him. Not that he’d say it to him.

One more thing denied Lachlan. Nay, he was not feeling pity for himself. Never. His temper roared like a hundred Highlanders on a charge. He pushed away from the wall, only realizing Caelen had left him. Halfway out of the courtyard, he turned back. His duty was to stand with MacLean.

Buy Link:
https://www.amazon.com/Highland-Scandal-Mageela-Troche-ebook/dp/B07KQLLPQY/

Social Media Links

website: http://www.MageelaTroche.com
Facebook: http://www.Facebook.com/AuthorMageelaTroche
Twitter: http://www.Twitter.com/MageelaTroche
Pinterest: http://www.Pinterest.com/MageelaTroche
blog: http://www.trocheauthor.wordpress.com
Amazon Author Page: https://www.amazon.com/Mageela-Troche/e/B00CHTIRFW/
Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/7054733.Mageela_Troche

Author Bio

An Air Force brat, Mageela Troche has lived throughout the world then landed in New York City. She wanted to leave the same day she arrived. Yet, with her stubbornness, Mageela learned to like the place and the libraries were the main reason. Since she was a little girl, Mageela wanted to be an author and an actress, however, once in college, she changed her life plan in the pursuit of money. After all, college loans must be repaid.

With life’s twists and turns, she returned to writing and focused on the romance genre. Mageela Troche’s first break came when she sold a short story to a magazine. She sold two more before the publication of her historical romance novel, The Marriage Alliance. She has gone on to write four more novels and a novella.

Mageela is currently writing in the cramped corner of her Big Apple apartment. She is the proud owner of a Black-masked lovebird named Boobula. She loves to hear from her readers and can be found online at MageelaTroche.com

Thanks for stopping by. Please leave Mageela a comment!

Furbaby Friday With Mary Morgan


I’m glad to welcome the talented Mary Morgan here to share her dearly loved little dog and new Medieval Holiday Romance, A HIGHLAND MOON ENCHANTMENT.

Mary: Dvorak’s Symphony No. 9 “The New World,” is a haunting, beautiful piece of music and one that brings me to tears whenever I listen to the melody. I love that it speaks to me of hope—a new world, especially when it was the last music I heard as I carried my beloved wee dachshund out the door of our apartment to the vets that day eleven years ago. Even as I sit here and type this post, my eyes are misted with unshed tears. She was diagnosed six months earlier with massive bone spurs in her spine and other issues that plagued her. The evenings were difficult, and she would whimper in constant pain. Pain meds did not help and surgery was not an option. When her legs began to give out, we knew it was time to send her to the Rainbow Bridge. It will always remain the most difficult decision that my husband and I made. But let me start at the beginning of her incredible life…

Liezzel (named after the girl, Liesl in the Sound of Music) entered our family at six weeks old. A name was chosen, and the children demanded to spell it their own way. In truth, she had many nicknames over the almost fifteen years of her life—from weasel, brat, nanny, nurse, escape artist, and my favorite, Brunhilda. She was a joy and light to everyone she met. A huge flirt with men, and sassy with women.

Whenever a new garden was planted in the spring, Liezzel had to supervise the planting. She never dug up the vegetables, flowers, or herbs, and not once did she use it as her toilet. She was inquisitive, often times watching me plant and then giving her final approval with an inspection.

Playtime was always an hour before meals. She’d bounce her ball all over the house for a solid hour. It would drive us crazy. Once, I took away her ball, but she would find something else and dash all around the kitchen. I realized it was a futile attempt to silence her. Even toward the end of her life, her love of playing never stopped.

We’ve had many animals in our family, but this doxie will always remain a treasured family member. Though I have never included a dachshund in my stories (perhaps one day), I honor my love of all animals in every book I write. They add an extra element to the story—one I treasure, and I hope you do, too.

Beth: This was deeply touching, Mary. 

A HIGHLAND MOON ENCHANTMENT by Mary Morgan
Release date: November 17, 2017
Publisher: The Wild Rose Press
Genre: Historical, Medieval, Scottish, Paranormal, Romance, Holiday
Length: Novella
**A tale from the Order of the Dragon Knights

Blurb:
You first meet this warrior in Dragon Knight’s Axe, Order of the Dragon Knights, Book 3

Irish warrior, Desmond O’Quinlan has never surrendered his heart to any woman. He has no wish to have his soul tortured by love. Yet, the moment he locks gazes with Ailsa, his fate is destined for an adventure he never fathomed. He may have battled alongside a Dragon Knight, but his greatest challenge will come from within his own heart.

Ailsa MacDuff, a warrior among her clan, has no desire to have a man chain her to a life of obedience. However, that is before she meets Desmond. The temptation to allow this warrior inside her heart is a risk she dares to take, but one that could lead to a future of emptiness and sorrow.

When betrayal looms from within, the battleground of love is no match for these two warriors. Can the power of a Highland full moon be strong enough to unite or destroy them?

Buy Links:
AMAZON: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0767QVJBX/
B&N: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/a-highland-moon-enchantment-mary-morgan/1127176325
Apple iBooks: https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/a-highland-moon-enchantment/id1294140045?mt=11
Kobo: https://www.kobo.com/us/en/ebook/a-highland-moon-enchantment

Author Bio:
Award-winning Scottish paranormal romance author, Mary Morgan, resides in Northern California, with her own knight in shining armor. However, during her travels to Scotland, England, and Ireland, she left a part of her soul in one of these countries and vows to return.

Mary’s passion for books started at an early age along with an overactive imagination. She spent far too much time daydreaming and was told quite often to remove her head from the clouds. It wasn’t until the closure of Borders Books where Mary worked that she found her true calling–writing romance. Now, the worlds she created in her mind are coming to life within her stories.

If you enjoy history, tortured heroes, and a wee bit of magic, then time-travel within the pages of her books.

Social Media Links:
WEBSITE: http://www.marymorganauthor.com
BLOG: http://www.marymorganauthor.com/blog
TWITTER: http://twitter.com/m_morganauthor
FACEBOOK AUTHOR PAGE: https://www.facebook.com/MaryMorganAuthor/

FACEBOOK: http://www.facebook.com/mary.morgan.564
GOODREADS: http://www.goodreads.com/author/show/8271002.Mary_Morgan
AMAZON AUTHOR PAGE: http://www.amazon.com/Mary-Morgan/e/B00KPE3NWI/
PINTEREST: www.pinterest.com/marymorgan50/
INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/marymorgan2/
BOOKBUB: https://www.bookbub.com/authors/mary-morgan

Thanks for stopping by! Please leave Mary a comment.

Giving My Herbal Lore Workshop In November!


If you missed my other workshops, or want to catch the updated version, I’m giving my Herbal Lore and the Historic Medicinal Uses of Herbs Workshop in November for Hearts Through History Romance Writers. Nonmembers are welcome to join in. To register follow this link to their lovely site:

https://www.heartsthroughhistory.com/workshops/workshop-on-herbal-lore-and-the-historic-medicinal-uses-of-herbs/

dill with white aster and other herbs and flowers in our garden(Dill and heirloom poppies from Monticello in our garden)

This workshop spans centuries of herbs and their lore from the ancients, through the British Isles, Colonial America, Native Americans, the Granny Women and the Mountain People of the Blue Ridge and Alleghenies (general Appalachia). Mountains are all around us here in the Shenandoah Valley. Participants will receive the eBook of my herbal, Plants for A Medieval Herb Garden in the British (also available in print if anyone’s interested).

medieval herb garden smaller size

There’s so much fascinating stuff to cover, I encourage participants to download and save files for later. I also welcome discussion and questions. My aim is for my workshop to be both informative and fun.

October Online Class–#Herbal Lore–Beth Trissel


If you missed my other online classes, or want to catch the updated version, I’m giving my Herbal Lore and the Historic Medicinal Uses of Herbs class in October for Hearts Through History Romance Writers. Non-members are welcome to join in. To register follow this link to their lovely site:

http://www.heartsthroughhistory.com/herbal-lore-and-the-historic-medicinal-uses-of-herbs/

dill with white aster and other herbs and flowers in our garden

(Dill and heirloom poppies from Monticello in our garden)

This workshop spans centuries of herbs and their lore from the ancients, through the British Isles, Colonial America, Native Americans, the Granny Women and the Mountain People of the Blue Ridge and Alleghenies (general Appalachia). Mountains are all around us here in the Shenandoah Valley. Participants will receive the eBook of my herbal, Plants for A Medieval Herb Garden in the British (also available in print if anyone’s interested).

medieval herb garden smaller size

There’s so much fascinating stuff to cover, I encourage participants to download and save files for later. I also welcome discussion and questions. My aim is for my workshop to be both informative and fun.

If You Love Herbs


Nonfiction Herbal

Nonfiction Herbal

My herbal, Plants for a Medieval Herb Garden in the British Isles, is reduced to.99 in Kindle through the 29th. The print book is a lovely option for those of you who prefer a book you can hold in your hands.

Daughter Elise designed the print book and did the gorgeous cover. Both the print and kindle formats are filled with wonderful images. In addition to being a book about herbs from the Middle Ages in the British Isles, it’s also about many of those plants commonly known today. Colonists brought a lot of their beloved herbs with them when they came to the New World.

Book Blurb: An illustrated collection of plants that could have been grown in a Medieval Herb or Physic Garden in the British Isles. The major focus of this work is England and Scotland, but also touches on Ireland and Wales. Information is given as to the historic medicinal uses of these plants and the rich lore surrounding them. Journey back to the days when herbs figured into every facet of life, offering relief from the ills of this realm and protection from evil in all its guises.

At Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Plants-Medieval-Garden-British-Isles-ebook/dp/B00IOGHYVU

Hearken Ye Back to the Days of Olde–Herbal Lore Workshop


If you missed my other workshops, or want to catch the updated version, I’m giving my Herbal Lore and the Historic Medicinal Uses of Herbs Workshop in November for Hearts Through History Romance Writers. Nonmembers are welcome to join in. To register follow this link to their lovely site:

http://www.heartsthroughhistory.com/herbal-lore-and-the-historic-medicinal-uses-of-herbs/

dill with white aster and other herbs and flowers in our garden

(Dill and heirloom poppies from Monticello in our garden)

This workshop spans centuries of herbs and their lore from the ancients, through the British Isles, Colonial America, Native Americans, the Granny Women and the Mountain People of the Blue Ridge and Alleghenies (general Appalachia). Mountains are all around us here in the Shenandoah Valley. Participants will receive the eBook of my herbal, Plants for A Medieval Herb Garden in the British (also available in print if anyone’s interested).

medieval herb garden smaller size

There’s so much fascinating stuff to cover, I encourage participants to download and save files for later. I also welcome discussion and questions. My aim is for my workshop to be both informative and fun.

“Good apple pies are a considerable part of our domestic happiness.” ~ Jane Austen


Apple BlossomsWith a foot of snow on the ground and near zero temps, this seems an apt time for an excerpt from my new herbal, Plants For A Medieval Herb Garden in the British Isles. The kindle version is out now; daughter Elise is formatting the print book. Lots of images to fit in. And now–apples. Bet you didn’t know they belonged in an herbal.

The history and lore behind apples is fascinating. And we all know what Johnny Appleseed thought vital to plant in America. The thing that most struck me in reading about apples, is how the history of the apple is closely linked with the history of man. From the earliest times, wherever people went, the apple went, and is associated with peace and a gentler life. If folk settled down, built a cottage and planted apple trees, that spoke to domesticity and disinterest in warfare. Maybe more people should plant them today. I do. And then all hold hands and sing the Johnny Appleseed Blessing to help bring about world peace.

AppleBack to apples. These early cultivars weren’t the sweet fruit we know today, but much smaller and tarter. In the Middle Ages, most apples were made into cider. By Shakespeare’s day, the new varieties were referred to as ‘dessert apples’ and served accompanied by caraway. Apples were probably introduced into Britain by the Romans and have a long history of use there. In the Scottish Highlands, the crabapple tree is the badge of the Lamont clan.

(Image of Cox’s Orange Pippin, an old heirloom apple)

From A Modern Herbal: “The chief dietetic value of apples lies in the malic and tartaric acids. These acids are of benefit to persons of sedentary habits, who are liable to liver derangements, and they neutralize the acid products of gout and indigestion. (You don’t want a deranged liver).

A knight, his lady, and an appleApple cookery is very early English: Piers Ploughman mentions ‘all the povere peple’ who ‘baken apples broghte in his lappes’ and the ever popular apple pie was no less esteemed in Tudor times than it is today, only our ancestors had some predilections in the matter of seasonings that might not now appeal to all of us, for they put cinnamon and ginger in their pies and gave them a lavish colouring of saffron. The original  pomatum seems to date from the herbalist Gerard’s days (1545-1612), when an ointment for roughness of the skin was made from apple pulp, swine’s grease, and rosewater. The Apple will also act as an excellent dentifrice.”

(Image of a knight, his lady, and an apple)

flowering crabapple April 2011 246From The Family Herbal: “The juice is cooling, and is good externally used in eruptions on the skin, and in diseases of the eyes, where a sharp humour is troublesome.”

(Crab apple in our yard)

“Even if I knew that tomorrow the world would go to pieces, I would still plant my apple tree.” ~Martin Luther