Tag Archives: Long and Short Reviews

Fabulous Review for Secret Lady at Long and Short Reviews


“I’m so glad I had the opportunity to read Secret Lady. Ms. Trissel never disappoints! I highly recommend Secret Lady to anyone looking for a sweet historical romance.” ~ Long and Short Reviews (Poinsettia)

For the Complete Review visit: http://www.longandshortreviews.com/book-reviews/secret-lady-by-beth-trissel/

Story Blurb:

At Lavender House, Evie McIntyre is haunted by the whispers from her bedroom closet. Before she can make sense of their murmurs, the house “warbles” between times and transports her to the Civil War. Past and present have blended, and Evie wishes she’d paid more attention to history. Especially since former Confederate officer, Jack Ramsey, could use a heads up.

Torn between opposing forces, Jack struggles to defend the valley and people he loves. Meeting Evie turns his already tumultuous world upside down. Will solving the mystery of the whispers return her home, and will the handsome scout be by her side?

reviewed by lasr (1)Against the background of Sheridan’s Burning of the Shenandoah Valley, Jack and Evie fight to save their friends and themselves – or is history carved in stone?

Secret Lady is available in print and kindle at Amazon and in eBook from all other online booksellers.

Amazon link: https://www.amazon.com/Secret-Lady-Ladies-Time-Book-ebook/dp/B07KNL7K3Z/

Up For Book of the Month at Long and Short Reviews!–Beth Trissel


historicalromancenovelkiradaughterofthemoonPlease vote for Historical Romance novel, Kira, Daughter of the Moon, up for Book of the Month at: Long and Short Reviews

(Voting runs from Wednesday, May 1st through Thursday, May 2nd).

A quote from Long and Short (Click link for full review) Rating: 5 stars

Reviewed by Poinsettia

“Ms. Trissel has done it again!

One of the things I enjoy most about Ms. Trissel’s writing is her amazing ability to transport readers directly into her stories. Her mastery of descriptive language never ceases to amaze me. “Green-gold light streamed through the rippling leaves while high overhead a yellow warbler trilled sweet, sweet, sweet and the warmth of hay-scented fern wafted on the mild breeze.” After reading this first sentence, I already felt as if I were standing next to Kira in the woods. I could see, hear, and smell everything she did. Completely immersed in the story, I eagerly dove into the pages that followed…

five star rating from LASRI have been a fan of Ms. Trissel’s work for years. Kira, Daughter of the Moon completely lived up to every one of my expectations. I highly recommend this wonderfully written tale to anyone who loves historical romance.”

Kira, Daughter of the Moon is available in print and kindle at Amazon and the Wild Rose Press, in Nookbook at Barnes & Noble, and ebook at other online booksellers.

Kira, Daughter of the Moon is the sequel to  award-winning historical romance novel, Through the Fire.

THROUGH THE FIRE Got A Great Review From LASR


Through The Fire by Beth Trissel
Publisher: The Wild Rose Press, American Rose
Genre: Historical, Action/Adventure
Length: Full Length (340 pgs)
Heat Level: Spicy
Rating: 4.5 Books
Review by Poinsettia

At the height of the French and Indian War, a young English widow ventures into the colonial frontier in search of a fresh start. She never expects to find it in the arms of the half-Shawnee, half-French warrior who makes her his prisoner in the raging battle to possess a continent––or to be aided by a mysterious white wolf and a holy man.

Rebecca was seeking a new life on the colonial frontier. She never expected to be taken captive by Shawnee warriors, or to fall in love with one of them.

Rebecca Elliot has had a rough life to say the least. She fled England and married a man in the colonies in order to free herself from her abusive father, who was trying to force her to marry someone against her will. Unfortunately, her husband, a British soldier, was killed during the French and Indian War. Rebecca decides to take her younger sister, Kate, out to the colonial frontier where she hopes they can stay with some family. However, her escort of British soldiers is attacked by a band of Shawnee warriors, who are allied with the French.

Kate manages to escape, but Rebecca is taken captive by a warrior named Shoka. At first, Rebecca fears that she will be killed, but Shoka treats her with kindness. Although Shoka originally intends to sell Rebecca to a Frenchman, it soon becomes apparent that the chemistry between he and Rebecca is too strong to ignore. Before they know it, they’ve fallen in love, but the path before them will not be an easy one. The French and Indian War is raging all around them, and Rebecca’s sister is still missing. To make matters worse, Shoka is being pursued by a Catawba warrior named Tonkawa who is bent on killing Shoka. If Tonkawa can’t kill Shoka, he just might settle for taking Rebecca instead.

As a heroine, Rebecca is extremely tough. Her life in England was spent shielding her younger sister from their abusive father, and Rebecca has the scars on her back to prove it. While the abuse Rebecca suffered could have broken her, instead, Rebecca developed into a strong young woman who is protective not only of her sister, but also of the people she cares about. Although Rebecca’s strength is certainly admirable, she can also be tremendously stubborn, which gets her into more then one scrape throughout the story that could have been avoided if she’d listened to those around her.

Shoka is a scarred hero. He doesn’t trust his immediate attraction to Rebecca because his first wife had many affairs and eventually left him. This has left him distrustful of women, especially very beautiful women. Even though he tries to fight it, Shoka finds himself falling in love with her, much to the dismay of his brother and some of the other members of the tribe. Despite their disapproval, Shoka is determined to protect the woman he loves no matter what.

I had previously admired Ms. Trissel’s use of descriptive language in one of her other works, and that is one of the reason’s I chose to read Through the Fire. I was very pleased to discover that this story contained the same strong imagery. “Shafts of late-day sunlight streamed through breaks in the thickly clustered trees to touch the nodding heads of columbine and rosy mountain laurel. The woods were like a garden long ago abandoned.” As I read this passage, I felt as though I were riding through the woods alongside Rebecca. “Wounded men writhed in the crushed grass, their piteous cries in her ears, while the dead lay where they’d fallen. Crimson stains pooled beneath them.” This brief passage describes one of the many action-packed battle scenes that really pulled me into the story so that I could see and hear the fighting around me.

Through the Fire is full of interesting characters, beautifully described scenery, and vivid action sequences. It is a must read for any fan of historical romance.