Tag Archives: Kira Daughter of the Moon

Up For Book of the Month at Long and Short Reviews!–Beth Trissel


historicalromancenovelkiradaughterofthemoonPlease vote for Historical Romance novel, Kira, Daughter of the Moon, up for Book of the Month at: Long and Short Reviews

(Voting runs from Wednesday, May 1st through Thursday, May 2nd).

A quote from Long and Short (Click link for full review) Rating: 5 stars

Reviewed by Poinsettia

“Ms. Trissel has done it again!

One of the things I enjoy most about Ms. Trissel’s writing is her amazing ability to transport readers directly into her stories. Her mastery of descriptive language never ceases to amaze me. “Green-gold light streamed through the rippling leaves while high overhead a yellow warbler trilled sweet, sweet, sweet and the warmth of hay-scented fern wafted on the mild breeze.” After reading this first sentence, I already felt as if I were standing next to Kira in the woods. I could see, hear, and smell everything she did. Completely immersed in the story, I eagerly dove into the pages that followed…

five star rating from LASRI have been a fan of Ms. Trissel’s work for years. Kira, Daughter of the Moon completely lived up to every one of my expectations. I highly recommend this wonderfully written tale to anyone who loves historical romance.”

Kira, Daughter of the Moon is available in print and kindle at Amazon and the Wild Rose Press, in Nookbook at Barnes & Noble, and ebook at other online booksellers.

Kira, Daughter of the Moon is the sequel to  award-winning historical romance novel, Through the Fire.

My New Historical Romance and the Very Unique Kira–Beth Trissel


The Rugged Alleghenies, A White Warrior, Beautiful Scots-Irish Healer, Unrequited Love—Requited, Charges of Witchcraft, Vindictive Ghost, Lost Treasure, Murderous Thieves, Deadly Pursuit, Hangman’s Noose Waiting…Kira, Daughter of the Moon

1765––The recent Indian wars are over (for now) and an uneasy truce in place. Free-spirited Kira is at odds with the superstitious Scots-Irish in the settlement and rumor spreads that she may be a witch. Her imagination runs to fairy rings, the little people, and haints (something that’s there but ain’t). She’s happiest out among the trees where she can hide from her painful past and any warriors who might again appear.

A gifted healer with a menagerie of wild creatures, she’s in the forest releasing a tame crow when her little beagle sounds the alarm. She peers warily from the leaves at the handsome young stranger. His buckskin breechclout and moccasins are more in keeping with a warrior’s than any frontiersmen she knows and there’s a stealth in his manner that reminds her of the way Indians pass through the trees. Yet he’s not a warrior. Unless, he’s a renegade. This is the set up for the story, but there’s a great deal more behind it, and especially, Kira, the most unique heroine I’ve ever written.

Not only does Kira have a tame crow she’s nursed back to health, but a number of wild animals under her care in what she calls her nursery, a protected nook in the woods close to the homestead where she lives with the Houston family who took her in after her parent’s death (relatives of the hero, Logan McCutcheon). Some of Kira’s babies ride in pockets she’s sewn inside her cloak for that purpose. Her guardian, particularly his wife, aren’t happy about hosting her creatures and banish the talkative crow, the reason she’s in the woods releasing him when she spots the potential threat.

Besides my love of animals, two books influenced this aspect of Kira’s character, one was a children’s book my youngest daughter brought home from the school library in fifth grade. I wish I could recall the title and maybe a helpful reader will because I’d love to locate a copy. I only remember it’s a true story about a family who took in injured and orphaned animals and I was much impressed by their talking crows. The second book, The Singing Creek Where the Willows Grow, The Mystical Nature Diary of Opal Whiteley, is a remarkable journal first written in crayon by an amazing girl, and later laboriously pierced back together after her sister shredded the pages. Sadly, Opal suffered from schizophrenia in an era when little was known about treatment, but her relationship with nature is the most outstanding I’ve ever come across.

When I first wrote Kira, Daughter of the Moon, I simply entitled the novel Kira, because she’s very much her own person. But she evolves into a much stronger young woman as a result of Logan’s return to her life, and that aspect of Kira is influenced by the Native Americans he counts as friends who give her the name, Daughter of the Moon.

***Kira, Daughter of the Moon is available in print and various ebook formats from The Wild Rose Press,  Amazon, Barnes & Noble in NookbookAll Romance eBooks, and other online booksellers.

Although written to stand alone, ‘Kira’ is the sequel to my award-winning historical romance novel Through the Fire. 

Release Day and the Story Behind Historical Romance Novel, Kira, Daughter of the Moon–Beth Trissel


Many stories lie at the heart of Kira, Daughter of the Moon, but the beginning emerged while I was writing Through the Fire, my award-winning historical romance novel with a The Last of the Mohican’s flavor. I hadn’t planned a sequel to Through the Fire, but vivid dreams of a plot line connected with that story came to me, and not only while I was asleep. Characters and scenes, or snatches of scenes, also flashed across my mind during waking hours. Although the best place for musing on a story dwells in that dreamy realm between wake and sleep.

I’m not sure how much time passed with me mentally filing away snatches of imagery before I actually began writing what grew into Kira, Daughter of the Moon. But these glimpses of a related novel led me to include certain elements in Through the Fire that later surfaced in Kira, Daughter of the Moon, including a treasure I can’t go into without giving away too much. And dead doesn’t necessarily mean gone. And I do mean dead, not the ‘you thought they were dead but weren’t really kind of stuff.’ I’m talking ghostly here.

No, you don’t have to read Through the Fire first to appreciate Kira, Daughter of the Moon, as the story is written to stand alone, but it would certainly enhance your experience. You may ask why it took me so long to complete this novel. Because I struggled with various portions, most importantly the ending–rather critical. I also originally wrote it entirely from the heroine, Kira’s, point of view, then went back and labored to add Logan’s. I should add that Logan is terrific. One of my all-time favorite heroes and a joy to work with. Keep in touch, dude.

Back to the saga of writing and rewriting ‘Kira’ – a journey I undertook annually, usually in the spring when the story is set. Gradually, the novel took form, but that ending still daunted me until, finally, I clearly envisioned how it went without lingering doubts.

No trouble. Ha! Nearly drove me insane getting it right. Who knows, maybe I am bonkers. “Writing is a socially acceptable form of schizophrenia.” ~E. L. Doctorow

As for me, I’ll just go and talk ‘amongst my selves’ while I work on my next project, or so it seems at times when the characters vie for space in my already overcrowded mind. Who said or did what–quick!  Write it down. It’s a mad scramble when the muse is with me. Nothing, when the voices are silent. I must listen well.

After all my blood, sweat, and tears, if you don’t like Kira, Daughter of the Moon, I’ll have my two-year old grandbaby, Chloe, give you the stink eye (no one does it better). If you’re a fan, she’ll do her super happy face. Feeling down?  She’ll sing you ‘Soft Kitty.’

This great quote sums up my writing motto: “I try to leave out the parts that people skip.” ~Elmore Leonard

Blurb:

Logan McCutcheon returns to colonial Virginia after seven years in the hands of Shawnee Indians. But was he really a captive, as everybody thinks? He looks and fights like a warrior, and seems eager to return to those he calls friends and family.

Kira McClure has waited for Logan all those years, passing herself off as odd to keep suitors at bay––and anyone else from getting too close.  Now that he’s back, he seems to be the only person capable of protecting her from the advances of Josiah Campbell and accusations of witchcraft.  And to defend the settlers against a well-organized band of murderous thieves.

Excerpt:

“My secret in exchange for yours.”

Tantalizing.  He was drawing her into his snare, but she couldn’t resist asking, “How do you know I’ve a secret?”

“To begin with, you’re hiding in a tree.  What from, a wild beast?”

“Near enough.  You.”

He smiled.  “Was I to think you a large red bird, or overlook you entirely?”

Drawing her remaining shreds of dignity around her like a mantle, she said, “This isn’t one of my best hiding places.”

“Indeed?  Where are the others?”

“That would be telling.”

The strengthening breeze tossed the branches around them as he considered.  “You never could keep secrets from me, Cricket.  I’ll discover them and you.”

An assertion she found both disturbing and oddly heartening.

His lips curved as if the deed were already done.  “Why were you hiding?  Am I so very frightening?”

“Oh––I feared you were some sort of warrior.”

The humor faded from his eyes.  “I am.”

***Kira, Daughter of the Moon is available in print and various ebook formats from The Wild Rose Press, from Amazon, Barnes & Noble’s Nookbook, All Romance eBooks, and other online booksellers.

***Royalty free images — Stunning covers by Rae Monet

***If anyone would like to review this novel, please contact me: bctrissel@yahoo.com

A Scots-Irish Healer in the Alleghenies Finds Herself Accused of Witchcraft–Beth Trissel


Can she entrust her future to him, or will fear keep her locked in the past?

1765—Full-blown spring has finally come to the hazy ridges of the Allegheny Mountains and the clannish Scots-Irish settled here can relax a bit. The recent Indian wars are over and an uneasy truce in place. Free-spirited Kira is at odds with the superstitious community and rumor is spreading that she may be a witch.


Her imagination runs to fairy rings, the ‘little people,’and ‘haints.’ She’s happiest out among the trees where she can hide from her painful past and any warriors who might again appear. A gifted healer with a menagerie of wild creatures, she’s in the woods releasing a tame crow when her little beagle sounds the alarm. She peers warily from the leaves at the handsome young stranger. His buckskin breechclout and moccasins are more in keeping with a warrior’s than any frontiersmen she knows and there’s a stealth in his manner that reminds her of the way Indians pass through the trees. Yet he’s not a warrior. Shafts of sunlight play over the reddish-brown hair falling to his well-muscled shoulders. Chills prickle down her spine. Is he some sort of renegade come to spy out their settlement? 

The spring of 1765 comes hard on the heels of the French and Indian War and Pontiac’s War. Settlements all along the colonial frontier have felt the wrath of tribes allied under Chief Pontiac. Many settlers have fled the mountains. The hardy Scots in Kira’s clan are holding on, but she’s badly shaken by the turbulent times—more so than most and with good reason. 

Set among the superstitious Scots in the rugged Alleghenies, Kira, Daughter of the Moon is an adventurous historical romance novel with a blend of Celtic and Native American flavors.

***Kira, Daughter of the Moon is available in print and various ebook formats from The Wild Rose Press, from Amazon, Barnes & Noble’s Nookbook, and will make its way to other online booksellers.

 

‘The Rugged Alleghenies, A White Warrior, Beautiful Scots-Irish Healer, Unrequited Love—Requited, Charges of Witchcraft, Vindictive Ghost, Lost Treasure, Murderous Thieves, Deadly Pursuit, Hangman’s Noose Waiting…Kira, Daughter of the Moon’

Fear of Witches in Colonial America and Today–Beth Trissel


My fascination with the supernatural, whether real or imagined, played an important role in my new historical romance novel, Kira, Daughter of the Moon. Murmurings against the unusual, young Scots-Irishwoman, Kira McClure, grow into accusations of witchcraft. Never a good thing, but especially not in the colonial Virginia frontier. Acceptance in a close-knit community could mean the difference between life and death. The highly superstitious Scots settled in the rugged Alleghenies on the heels of The French and Indian War were already wary. The dangers these dark woods held heightened their fear of the supernatural. Sick livestock, children struck down with illness, and other misfortunes might be blamed on witchcraft. Settlers were alert to anyone in their midst they could point to as the culprit. The farther people ventured from more civilized society, the deeper their superstitions ran. And taking the law, such as it was, into their own hands was often how they dealt with miscreants in the frontier .

Late Shenandoah Valley historian, John Heatwole, much respected and a family friend, put together a wonderful collection of accounts from valley and mountain people regarding their experiences with and feelings toward so-called witches. His book deals with beliefs lingering into the 20th century, but they’re still present among some rural Virginians today. Fear best sums up their sentiments. In his book, Shenandoah Voices, Mr. Heatwole says, “Witches have not been tried, jailed or executed in America since the early 18th century, but tales of their activities persist. During that period in our history, superstitious practices invoked for self-protection were considered prudent dabbling in the occult and virtually harmless. Powers or practices called upon for mean-spirited or evil purposes were attributed to malevolent people in the community who wielded demonic powers. Despite the perception of evil, people suspected of being witches, who were mostly women, were often tolerated in society because of their family ties or from fear of retribution—no one wanted to get on the wrong side of a witch.”

True. However, ‘often tolerated,’ doesn’t mean those perceived as witches were popular. He shares accounts and I’ve read others, of outspoken or in some way unique females, perhaps even deformed, thought to be in league with the devil who were ostracized. Not being accepted and possibly even tormented by your neighbors was harsh, particularly for the poor and elderly. On the one hand, a woman might gain power over others, even men, in a historically male dominated society, through the fear she intentionally or unintentionally provoked, but the danger that people would shun her was always present–unless she was well-to-do. The rich were always better tolerated.

Spells and hexes were countered by witch doctors, usually men, although ‘Granny women’ were also known for battling the dark arts with magical incantations. I have friends who grew up ‘back in the holler’ and remember bringing in the Granny woman when home remedies failed. One common protection prudent mothers undertook for children was to sew little ‘acifidity’ bags filled with pungent herbs, garlic and asafetida,  to hang around their necks. “Oh my, did these kids stink,’ one friend told me. The stench was to drive away illness and evil. These stinky bags may be out of favor now, but the fear that lay behind them is still quite real among some folk.

You may ask if any of the women, and occasionally men, thought to be witches actually were? Yes. And some of them sound pretty darn scary.

For my recent post on that visit:

One of the Scariest Ghost/Witch Stories Ever

***Royalty free images