Tag Archives: John Adams

Thomas Jefferson–Foe of Tyranny, Author of Freedom!


Thomas JeffersonThomas Jefferson is one of the wisest most accomplished men who ever lived. Not perfect, but amazing. He was a founding father of America, the principal author of the Declaration of Independence, the third president of the United States, and foe of oppressive government. He and John Adams, another brilliant founding father and our second president, both died on the 4th of July–such a key day for them and America. The two men had a volatile relationship, but were fast friends in their later years.

Adams’s last words were, “Thomas Jefferson still survives.” But he was mistaken, Jefferson had died five hours earlier at Monticello at the age of 82.

In these challenging times, it’s prudent to look back at those who helped create this great nation and learn from their wisdom. Some quotes from Jefferson:

Peace and friendship with all mankind is our wisest policy, and I wish we may be permitted to pursue it. ~Thomas Jefferson

~I have sworn upon the altar of God, eternal hostility against every form of tyranny over the mind of man.

                      ~One man with courage is a majority.

Colonial American Soldier

~Happiness is not being pained in body or troubled in mind.

~Always take hold of things by the smooth handle.

~He who knows best knows how little he knows.

~It is in our lives and not our words that our religion must be read.

~It is neither wealth nor splendor; but tranquility and occupation which give you happiness.

~If God is just, I tremble for my country.

~I believe that every human mind feels pleasure in doing good to another.

~I cannot live without books.

~But friendship is precious, not only in the shade, but in the sunshine of life, and thanks to a benevolent arrangement the greater part of life is sunshine.

~I hope our wisdom will grow with our power, and teach us, that the less we use our power the greater it will be.

~Nothing can stop the man with the right mental attitude from achieving his goal; nothing on earth can help the man with the wrong mental attitude.

~I own that I am not a friend to a very energetic government. It is always oppressive.

~I predict future happiness for Americans if they can prevent the government from wasting the labors of the people under the pretense of taking care of them.

The Wisdom of Thomas Jefferson, Colonial Williamsburg, and Monticello

~I would rather be exposed to the inconveniences attending too much liberty than those attending too small a degree of it.

~My reading of history convinces me that most bad government results from too much government.

~No occupation is so delightful to me as the culture of the earth, and no culture comparable to that of the garden.

~Were it left to me to decide whether we should have a government without newspapers, or newspapers without a government, I should not hesitate a moment to prefer the latter.

~We never repent of having eaten too little.

~We hold these truths to be self-evident: that all men are created equal; that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable rights; that among these are life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.

~Walking is the best possible exercise. Habituate yourself to walk very fast.

~When you reach the end of your rope, tie a knot in it and hang on.

~There is not a truth existing which I fear… or would wish unknown to the whole world.


~Whenever you do a thing, act as if all the world were watching.

~Where the press is free and every man able to read, all is safe.

~To compel a man to furnish funds for the propagation of ideas he disbelieves and abhors is sinful and tyrannical.

~That government is the strongest of which every man feels himself a part.

~The earth belongs to the living, not to the dead.

~The glow of one warm thought is to me worth more than money.

~The God who gave us life, gave us liberty at the same time.

~The natural progress of things is for liberty to yield and government to gain ground.

~Politics is such a torment that I advise everyone I love not to mix with it.Sometimes it is said that man cannot be trusted with the government of himself. Can he, then be trusted with the government of others? Or have we found angels in the form of kings to govern him? Let history answer this question.

~Determine never to be idle. No person will have occasion to complain of the want of time who never loses any. It is wonderful how much may be done if we are always doing.

~Do you want to know who you are? Don’t ask. Act! Action will delineate and define you.

*Jefferson’s beloved home and gardens of Monticello

“We hold these truths to be self-evident…”


the ConstitutionThomas Jefferson and John Adams both died on July 4th, 1826, on the 50th anniversary of the Declaration of Independence. Adams was 90, and Jefferson, 82. Adams’ last words were, ‘Thomas Jefferson still survives.’ But he was mistaken. Jefferson had died five hours earlier at his beloved Monticello.

At the time of their deaths, Adams and Jefferson were the last two surviving members of the original American revolutionaries who stood up to Great Britain and forged a new government. Along the way, they disagreed as to how to best found this infant democracy, but both upheld beliefs in liberty and the truths laid forth in the Declaration of Independence. For a time, their heated disagreement led to animosity between them and they lost the deep connection they once had. Fortunately, they reestablished this close bond in the last 14 years of their lives through regular correspondence, and died as good friends.

(Image of the Constitution above)

Some timely quotes from these brilliant and vital Founding Fathers. Without them, America would not exist. If these men were here today, I suspect they would have plenty to say about the state of our nation.

old colonial cemetary“Posterity! You will never know how much it cost the present Generation to preserve your Freedom! I hope you will make good use of it. If you do not, I shall repent in Heaven, that I ever took half the Pains to preserve it.” – John Adams

(Old colonial cemetery in New England)

“History, in general, only informs us what bad government is.” ― Thomas JeffersonLetters of Thomas Jefferson

“The most valuable of all talents is that of never using two words when one will do.” (Lawyers and politicians take note)
― Thomas Jefferson

Indepenance Hall“We in America do not have government by the majority. We have government by the majority who participate.”
― Thomas Jefferson

“A Constitution of Government once changed from Freedom, can never be restored. Liberty, once lost, is lost forever.”
― John AdamsLetters of John Adams, Addressed to His Wife

“The longer I live, the more I read, the more patiently I think, and the more anxiously I inquire, the less I seem to know…Do justly. Love mercy. Walk humbly. This is enough.”
― John AdamsThe Letters of John and Abigail Adams

(Independence Hall in Philadelphia)

“Let us tenderly and kindly cherish therefore, the means of knowledge. Let us dare to read, think, speak, and write .” ― John AdamsThe Works Of John Adams, Second President Of The United States

Liberty bell Philadelphia isolated on white“Whereas it appeareth that however certain forms of government are better calculated than others to protect individuals in the free exercise of their natural rights, and are at the same time themselves better guarded against degeneracy, yet experience hath shewn, that even under the best forms, those entrusted with power have, in time, and by slow operations, perverted it into tyranny.” ~Thomas Jefferson

(The Liberty Bell)

“Facts are stubborn things; and whatever may be our wishes, our inclinations, or the dictates of our passion, they cannot alter the state of facts and evidence.” (Unarguably)
― John AdamsThe Portable John Adams

“I’m a greater believer in luck, and I find the harder I work the more I have of it”  ― Thomas Jefferson

young girls in colonial garb at historic farm“There are two types of education… One should teach us how to make a living, and the other how to live.” – John Adams

“I must study Politics and War that my sons may have liberty to study Mathematics and Philosophy.” – John Adams, letter to Abigail Adams, May 12, 1780.

“Our Constitution was made only for a moral and religious people. It is wholly inadequate to the government of any other.” – John Adams

“Children should be educated and instructed in the principles of freedom.” ~John Adams

“If a nation expects to be ignorant and free, in a state of civilization, it expects what never was and never will be.”  ― Thomas Jefferson

Horse drawn carriage in Williamsburg“I always consider the settlement of America with reverence and wonder, as the opening of a grand scene and design in providence, for the illumination of the ignorant and the emancipation of the slavish part of mankind all over the earth.” ~John Adams

“There is danger from all men. The only maxim of a free government ought to be to trust no man living with power to endanger the public liberty.” ~John Adams

(Horse drawn carriage in colonial Williamsburg)

“The equal rights of man, and the happiness of every individual, are now acknowledged to be the only legitimate objects of government.”
― Thomas JeffersonLetters of Thomas Jefferson

459505669“We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.” ~From The Declaration of Independence, penned by Thomas Jefferson

(The Declaration of Independence and the Betsy Ross Flag)

There are so many more nuggets of wisdom I could have included. And I know I’ve said this before, but if you haven’t seen the John Adams series, do!

I love the theme song.

Now They’re Even Criminalizing Seeds. No, Seriously–Beth Trissel


sprouting seedIn government(s) gone mad even vegetable seeds are coming under bureaucratic regulation.  This alarming heads up is from Natural News: “A new law proposed by the European Commission would make it illegal to “grow, reproduce or trade” any vegetable seeds that have not been “tested, approved and accepted” by a new EU bureaucracy named the “EU Plant Variety Agency. It’s called the Plant Reproductive Material Law, and it attempts to put the government in charge of virtually all plants and seeds. Home gardeners who grow their own plants from non-regulated seeds would be considered criminals under this law. The draft text of the law, which has already been amended several times due to a huge backlash from gardeners, is viewable here.

The article goes on to say: “Virtually all plants, vegetable seeds and gardeners to eventually be registered by government…Nearly all varieties of heirloom vegetable seeds will be criminalized under this proposed EU law. This means the act of saving seeds from one generation to the next — a cornerstone of sustainable living — will become a criminal act.”

garden in ray of sunshineUnbelievable. This would be most of what I grow. Will America be next? Given the regulatory madness of  our federal government and current administration, I fear it very well could.  President Obama signed Executive Order 13603. I hadn’t even heard about it until I noted a comment under the article at Natural News, so I did a little digging. What I learned is alarming. From New American (one of several sites with similar reports, though not mainstream media sources which avoid covering any non government approved news) Apparently it’s a “National Defense Resources Preparedness,” issued a little over a year ago, on March 16, 2012. This executive order is frightening because of its sweeping scope, explicitly declaring that the president and his designated Cabinet and agency heads have authority to commandeer and control: all water,  all human and animal food,  all transportation,  all energy, all construction materials, all “health resources,” all farm equipment, all fertilizers, all fuels, … and much more.”

Minuteman Statue, American Revolution, Concord, Militia, Independence, Statue,Our Founding Fathers would be appalled. But they warned us repeatedly about cherishing and protecting our freedoms which Americans have failed to do.

John Adams said in a letter to his wife Abigail, “Liberty once lost is lost forever.” I even did a post on that which you are invited to read HERE.

I fear we may need another revolution and I really don’t feel up to it. “Absolute power corrupts absolutely.”

Lest We Forget–Beth Trissel


In these troubled times in America, it’s wise to remember where we came from  and what our founders envisioned for this great nation. Being an American is a sacred privilege, our hard-won freedoms, fast eroding, should never be taken for granted, and preserving these inalienable rights, a call to arms for all who cherish liberty. With that in mind, I highly recommend watching the excellent HBO production that came out several years ago featuring the indomitable John Adams–appropriately entitled John Adams. Not to be confused (as I’ve done) with an earlier production, The Adam’s Chronicles. 

What John Adams and his remarkable wife, Abigail, and their entire family suffered and sacrificed in the forging of America is unbelievable. Not only them, but countless others as well.  I wonder if I’d last a day in that turbulent era, and yet, my forebears did.  So did many of yours.  If your ancestors were not yet in this country at its birth, no doubt they played an important role in making America what it is, or is intended to be, at its finest. Let us not forget, or our children and grandchildren will pay the price. Theirs already is a vastly different America than the nation envisioned by its outstanding founders with their mind-boggling perseverance.

As an author with several stories set in early America, and currently at work on the sequel to my Revolutionary War romance novel Enemy of the King, I’m particularly mindful of our roots.  Join me in the quest to remember.

“Posterity! You will never know how much it cost the present Generation to preserve your Freedom! I hope you will make good use of it. If you do not, I shall repent in Heaven, that I ever took half the Pains to preserve it.” ― John Adams

“Liberty cannot be preserved without general knowledge among the people.”~ John Adams


Today is the ten-year anniversary of 9/11, an unspeakably terrible day in America’s history.  And ever with us now after this shattering death of innocence, the fear of some new, yet unnamed  horror.  Almighty God forbid.  Our prayers  rise to heaven.  If all nations of the world refuse to allow terrorists to live in their land and demand justice for their heinous crimes, it will come.

With all the remembrances taking place today, I add a call to remember the men and women who sacrificed everything to forge this nation.  Too few have any idea of the enormous events that took place over 200 years ago during the American Revolution.   If we better remembered our roots, Americans would be more deeply grounded in what truly matters and not take freedom for granted.  It was hard-won and can be taken away, is already under assault. Americans cannot go forward in the right spirit until we remember where we came from.

“I always consider the settlement of America with reverence and wonder, as the opening of a grand scene and design in providence, for the illumination of the ignorant and the emancipation of the slavish part of mankind all over the earth.”
John Adams

With that in mind, here’s the stirring theme from the Amazing mini series John Adams, which I highly recommend.

If You Like Colonial American Romance Set During The Revolution~


“In addition to creating memorable characters, Ms. Trissel makes wonderful use of descriptive language. “Dreadful screeching, like the cries of an enraged cat, tore through the muggy night and into Meriwether’s chamber…The sweetness of jasmine wafted from the trellised vine as she peered down through moss-draped branches.”  Description like this can be found throughout Enemy of the King and really pulled me into the story so that I felt as if I were actually there.

I thoroughly enjoyed reading Enemy of the King. Not only are the characters memorable and the setting beautifully described, but the action is riveting and the romance between Meri and Jeremiah is tender.  I highly recommend Enemy of the King to anyone who loves a well crafted historical romance.”

~Poinsettia Long and Short Reviews

BHB READER’S CHOICE BEST BOOKS OF 2009 AT PUBLISHER’S WEEKLY BEYOND HER BOOKS

ENEMY OF THE KING AT: FIND A GREAT ROMANCE BLOGSPOT~

ENEMY OF THE KING ON BEST ROMANCE NOVEL LIST AT BUZZLE!

ENEMY OF THE KING AT HISTORY UNDRESSED~

ENEMY OF THE KING AT LITERATURE PROJECT~

ENEMY OF THE KING AT BEST ROMANCE NOVELS TODAY~

BHB READER’S CHOICE BEST BOOKS OF 2009 list~

1.  Blood Promise by Richelle Mead
2.  In Over Her Head by Judi Fennell
3.  Enemy of the King by Beth Trissel
4.  Succubus Heat by Richelle Mead (tie)
4.  Through the Fire by Beth Trissel (tie)
5.  Daughter of the Wind by Beth Trissel
6.  Thorn Queen by Richelle Mead
7.  The Strangely Beautiful Tale of Miss Percy Parker by Leanna Renee Hieber
8.  Tempted by P. C. Cast
9.  City of Glass by Cassandra Clare
10. Bad Moon Rising by Sherrilyn Kenyon

Enemy of the King is an amazing and vibrant look into the American Revolutionary War and tells the story through the eyes of a remarkable woman. While Jeremiah Jordan himself is a strong soldier and heroic patriot, it is Meriwether Steele who makes such a great impression in this epic novel. Her dedication to the man she loves, the lengths she must go to defend herself and others, and the unstoppable force that she is makes Meriwether one heck of a heroine.

Ms. Trissel brings the countryside and its people alive with her fascinating and at times gory details. This sexy historical book is a must read!

~Danielle
Reviewer for Coffee Time Romance & More

ENEMY OF THE KING AT MISTRESS BELLA REVIEWS~

“I love historical romances. They are one of my favorites and anymore when I think of a historical I think of Beth Trissel. She is an author who has proved herself over time. She is a beautiful storyteller. Ms. Trissel can take a story line and make it a work of art. And she did just that with Enemy of the King.

This tale was so wonderful; it really was a magical read. As soon as I started reading I felt like I was in the pages. The author has a way of pulling you into the story; this is your story. I could see the characters and the images Ms. Trissel described as if I were there or watching a film on TV. It’s a classic read for the ages and I highly recommend this book to everyone who wants to read a true fairy-tale.”

Blurb: 1780, South Carolina: While Loyalist Meriwether Steele recovers from illness in the stately home of her beloved guardian, Jeremiah Jordan, she senses the haunting presence of his late wife. When she learns that Jeremiah is a Patriot spy and shoots Captain Vaughan, the British officer sent to arrest him, she is caught up on a wild ride into Carolina back country, pursued both by the impassioned captain and the vindictive ghost. Will she remain loyal to her king and Tory twin brother or risk a traitor’s death fighting for Jeremiah? If Captain Vaughan snatches her away, he won’t give her a choice.~

ENEMY OF THE KING is Published by the Wild Rose Press~also available At Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and other online booksellers.

*THEME SONG FROM HBO’S PRODUCTION JOHN ADAMS~This song is awesome.  And if you haven’t seen the series, do.

For Those Who Live In Or Long For The Country~


Gardening requires lots of water – most of it in the form of perspiration.  ~Lou Erickson

Weather means more when you have a garden.  There’s nothing like listening to a shower and thinking how it is soaking in around your green beans.  ~Marcelene Cox

There can be no other occupation like gardening in which, if you were to creep up behind someone at their work, you would find them smiling.  ~Mirabel Osler

Gardening is a matter of your enthusiasm holding up until your back gets used to it.  ~Author Unknown

The best place to seek God is in a garden.  You can dig for him there.  ~George Bernard Shaw

The greatest gift of the garden is the restoration of the five senses.  ~Hanna Rion

I used to visit and revisit it a dozen times a day, and stand in deep contemplation over my vegetable progeny with a love that nobody could share or conceive of who had never taken part in the process of creation.  It was one of the most bewitching sights in the world to observe a hill of beans thrusting aside the soil, or a rose of early peas just peeping forth sufficiently to trace a line of delicate green.  ~Nathaniel Hawthorne, Mosses from and Old Manse

Gardening is about enjoying the smell of things growing in the soil, getting dirty without feeling guilty, and generally taking the time to soak up a little peace and serenity.  ~Lindley Karstens, noproblemgarden.com

No two gardens are the same.  No two days are the same in one garden.  ~Hugh Johnson

I think that if ever a mortal heard the voice of God it would be in a garden at the cool of the day.  ~F. Frankfort Moore, A Garden of Peace

Last night, there came a frost, which has done great damage to my garden…. It is sad that Nature will play such tricks on us poor mortals, inviting us with sunny smiles to confide in her, and then, when we are entirely within her power, striking us to the heart.  ~Nathaniel Hawthorne, The American Notebooks

I have never had so many good ideas day after day as when I worked in the garden.  ~John Erskine

As much as I converse with sages and heroes, they have very little of my love and admiration. I long for rural and domestic scene, for the warbling of birds and the prattling of my children.  ~ John Adams

“The quality of mercy is not strained,
It droppeth as the gentle rain from heaven
Upon the place beneath; it is twice blessed;
It blesseth him that gives and him that takes…”
~ Shakespeare

The problem with cities is that people don’t learn what really matters. Don’t really feel or know the rhythms of the earth. When we are separated from that vital center place, we grow lost. Sadly, most people will never know what they are lost from, or where they can be found. ~ Beth

I looked out the window and the swallows are back, skimming over the pond. They weren’t there this morning. Not a single one. Now they are, and a flush of rose suffuses the trees on the hill above the meadow. I love the tender new leaves.

Our meadow is as lush as I’ve ever seen it. Thick grass, reaching past my knees, spreads in a green swathe from fence row to fence row and sparkles with bright gold dandelions and buttercups. The elusive meadowlark, my favorite songbird, trills sweetly from secret places hidden in the green. Rarely, I catch a magical flash of yellow as it flies, just before it tucks down again. Sandy brown killdeer dart around the edges of the pond on their long legs, sounding that wild funny cry peculiar to them.

The green-blue water that fills the banks of the pond now had dried to a painful parched puddle last summer. Migrating mallards and ruddy ducks ripple over the surface, bobbing bottoms up, and fill the air with busy gossipy quacks, content and happy creatures. Not so the plump gray and white barnyard geese. Their honking clash and chatter punctuates life on the farm, more or less, depending on their current level of hysteria.

Some of the geese have been here time out of mind, waddling about with their broken useless wings, reminding me of nervous old ladies who can’t find their glasses and are forever misplacing their grandchildren. More than once we’ve had to rescue a frantic gosling inadvertently left behind by its addled elders in a hole wallowed by the cows. Silly, silly geese. I scold the dogs when they’re tempted to chase and annoy them. Too easy, and it doesn’t seem fair.

****

In my garden, I have a sea of herbs and flowers continually changing with the season. Some perennials are lost each winter and new ones are planted by Elise and me, others by the birds. I’ve a wild aster that blooms in late spring, covered with small white flowers. It’s very pretty really, although hard to contain. I like white flowers glowing at dusk while all else fades.

Several plants reign supreme because of Elise. ‘Magic flowers,’ yellow evening primrose, have taken over a generous quadrant at the edge of the vegetable garden. She rushes me out at twilight to view the wonder as they pop open, charged with fragrance. Hummingbird moths swoop in like little fairies to feed on the blossoms.

She doesn’t like the bats that also come. I love the nighthawks. Dill is also taking over because black swallowtail butterflies lay their eggs on its leaves and hatch into little caterpillars which she watches closely, puts some into jars and feeds until they make a chrysalis, then one day they emerge with wet crumpled wings and she releases them to the sky. I feel a bit like those uncertain butterflies, taking those first tentative flights.

****

*Pic of wash day at a neighbor’s farm.

*My garden in a sunbeam

*Pics of our farm and the valley

*Evening Primrose

*Spring in the Shenandoah Valley