Tag Archives: Flower

Weddings and “Bridal Wreath” with Author Donna Dalton


Bridle_Wreath_SpireaWelcome Donna. I’m also a fan of spirea. Now, back to Donna, her lovely post, new release, and ***Giveaway!

Spirea is one of those old-fashioned, heirloom shrubs that many people prize. My grandmother had several bushes growing in her yard. They are easy to maintain and some varieties can grow up to eight feet tall and twelve feet in diameter. The Vanhoutte Spirea, often called the “bridal wreath”, has a fountain-like growth with a rounded top and arching branches that curve to the ground. In late spring, the pendants bloom with tufts of small white flowers that give off a honey-sweet aroma.  The leaves are small and greenish-blue and will turn plum-colored in the fall. It’s no wonder the pliable branches from this lovely bush are often used as decorations.

In researching my historical short story, LOVING BYRNE, I discovered that spirea was often used to festoon wedding venues. Arches and columns were wrapped with them. They were arranged in vases and used in bouquets. They were even woven into wreaths, hence the name. So, when I created the wedding hall for my story, I decorated it with spirea and white roses. That hall must have smelled heavenly. 🙂

***Sounds beautiful. We used spirea in my daughter Alison’s wedding. What an enchanting addition to your story.

LovingByrne_w7965_750For those interested in learning more about Donna’s short story, here’s a blurb for LOVING BYRNE.

Lieutenant Stephen Byrne stands guard over a British envoy asleep after an all-day drinking binge. So when his fiancée arrives, Stephen feels safe leaving his post for a quick meal. Yet his worst nightmare comes true when the Englishman slips from the room and leaves the hotel.

Victoria Manning will soon have everything she’s ever wanted—a loving husband and a new life at Fort Leavenworth as an Army officer’s wife. When loneliness and a special picnic lunch for her fiancé bring her to the Willard Hotel, their meal soon falls by the wayside as their passion ignites and their agreement of abstinence is put to the test.

Stephen and Victoria must put their special night on hold as they search for the fugitive envoy. Can they find him and save Stephen’s commission in the Army, or will their future together be in jeopardy?

Amazon Kindle Link

***Leave a comment and be entered into a drawing to win a free electronic copy of any of Donna’s published works.

Learn more about Donna and her books at www.donnadalton.net.

Donna Dalton….romancing the past

Oh, and cookies to be served shortly. Still in the oven. 🙂

“But he who dares not grasp the thorn Should never crave the rose.” ~Anne Brontë


beautiful pink roses“The rose speaks of love silently, in a language known only to the heart.”

*Roses from my garden

“You are responsible, forever, for what you have tamed. You are responsible for your rose.”  Antoine de Saint-Exupery

I’d rather have roses on my table than diamonds on my neck.  ~Emma Goldman

To be overcome by the fragrance of flowers is a delectable form of defeat.  ~Beverly Nichols

bright apricot roses“A single rose can be my garden…a single friend, my world.” ~Leo Buscaglia

“Perfumes are the feelings of flowers.”

~Heinrich HeineThe Hartz Journey

“Give me odorous at sunrise a garden of beautiful flowers where I can walk undisturbed.” ~Walt Whitman

“I perhaps owe having become a painter to flowers.” ~Claude Monet

rose“Love is like the wild rose-briar; Friendship like the holly-tree. The holly is dark when the rose-briar blooms, but which will bloom most constantly?” ― Emily BrontëThe Complete Poems

“A profusion of pink roses bending ragged in the rain speaks to me of all gentleness and its enduring.”  ~The Collected Later Poems of William Carlos Williams

‘”People from a planet without flowers would think we must be mad with joy the whole time to have such things about us.” ~Iris MurdochA Fairly Honourable Defeat

Abraham Darby Rose by David Austen“But he that dares not grasp the thorn Should never crave the rose.”~Anne Bronte

“And she was fair as is the rose in May.” ~ Geoffrey Chaucer

“They are not long, the days of wine and roses. Out of a misty dream, our path emerges for a while, then closes, within a dream.”  ― Ernest DowsonThe Poems and Prose of Ernest Dowson

June In Our Garden–Beth Trissel


June Excerpts from my nonfiction book,  Shenandoah Watercolors, a 2012 EPIC eBook Awards Finalist.  Images of the garden by daughter Elise.  This photograph is of our double-flowered apricot hollyhocks. This year I shall try to remember to save seed.
“It’s the longest day of the year, one to bottle and take out when November is come and the day ends at 5:00. I will tip the bottle over and pour liquid sunlight all over the gray autumnal shadows as they seep over the hills and into the meadow…the scents too, new mown hay, lavender, attar of roses, and the gleeful chatter of birds.”


“To see the Summer Sky
Is Poetry, though never in a Book it lie –
True Poems flee.”
~Emily Dickinson
“This morning glows like a green-gold sun drop and every blade of grass glistens in the light. The newly washed spires of larkspur stand tall to greet the day. Fellows on every side, yellow lilies, bright-eyed pansies, lavender candytuft, crimson yarrow, and white asters all sit up straighter as if answering an unspoken summons and shine. Is it magic or June in the Valley? Is there a difference? ”
“Several plants reign supreme because of Elise. ‘Magic flowers,’ yellow evening primrose, have taken over a generous quadrant at the edge of the vegetable garden. She rushes me out at twilight to view the wonder as they pop open, charged with fragrance. Hummingbird moths swoop in like little fairies to feed on the blossoms.

She doesn’t like the bats that also come. I love the nighthawks. Dill is also taking over because black swallowtail butterflies lay their eggs on its leaves and hatch into little caterpillars which she watches closely, puts some into jars and feeds until they make a chrysalis, then one day they emerge with wet crumpled wings and she releases them to the sky.

I feel a bit like those uncertain butterflies, taking those first tentative flights. “~ 

“The best place to seek God is in a garden.  You can dig for him there.” ~George Bernard Shaw

“Brilliant yellow gold finches streaked across the garden today and landed on the fence beside the hollyhocks. I love these birds, one of my absolute favorites. In midsummer, when the sunflowers bloom, they gather in chattering clusters to feed on the seeds. Their wings flash in the sun as they suspend on flower heads and peck away, and meticulously open each seed. I’ve never heard such euphoric birds, continually exclaiming over their finds. They have a lot to say and do not keep secrets well.

If I were to confide in birds, it would not be them, or to crows, loudly proclaiming the latest gossip. Warblers are fairy creatures, but not silent fairies. Possibly to wolves––no. They howl. Frogs croak and gribbit. Turtles are quiet. Tell all to turtles, then. Box or painted ones. Snappers are treacherous and would as soon bite you as listen.”

“The larkspur is in full bloom, a sea of blue and pink spires rise above a mass of poppies. Delphinium is a more glorious shade of blue but I lost so many blooms to gusting winds and winter cold that I finally became discouraged with cultivating those beauties. And so I content myself with larkspur, simpler but a survivor as are so many of the old heirloom flowers. Someday I will be an heirloom. Maybe I already am. But there are not many people in this world like me as there are seedlings of larkspur. ”

*Note, I recently took the plunge and planted more delphinium seedlings, so we shall see.  One must try and nurture that which we love.

“I’ve enough spare flowers to fill a meadow and make butterflies and bees giddy with delight, but who would tend them? Only the most ‘satisfactory’ plants could compete with the grass and weeds that would choke them out. How do wild flowers survive? Queen Ann’s lace, tiny red poppies, and blue chicory run free along our unruly roadsides. Orange day lilies too, but they are tough with gnarly roots.”

“A sea of herbs and flowers continually change with the season. Some perennials are lost each winter and new ones are planted by Elise and me, others by the birds. I’ve a wild aster that blooms in late spring, covered with small white flowers. It’s very pretty really, although hard to contain. I like white flowers. They glow at dusk while all else fades. ”

“Earth laughs in flowers.” ~Ralph Waldo Emerson

“I’m particularly drawn to the heirloom varieties and the English cottage garden look. Even with these fairly trouble free plants it still takes considerable effort to fight the weeds and curtail the extremely aggressive flowers.

Years ago, I met a gardener who referred to the varieties that take over the garden on their march to the sea as ‘highly successful.’  So are weeds. The beds I tend could never be called orderly and can best be described as a happy confusion of plants. And we’ve nothing to sit on outside, so one simply strolls about and then comes back indoors. And one works one’s tail off.

My job? To tend this bit of earth, but mostly to savor and learn.”~

If it could always be June…

“What is one to say about June, the time of perfect young summer, the fulfillment of the promise of the earlier months, and with as yet no sign to remind one that its fresh young beauty will ever fade.” ~Gertrude Jekyll

***Shenandoah Watercolors is available in print and kindle at Amazon.

Finding Gold in Herbal Lore–Calendula


QuantcastIn late May–June, calendula flowers wink cheerily in the herb and perennial border that stretches along the road like a colorful island in  a grassy sea.  The plants prefer cooler sunny weather so fall off during the hot summer months to re-bloom again n autumn. They also reseed freely.

These Calendula flowers are special with dark eyes dotting the centers of orange, saffron, yellow, and apricot flowers. A wealth of lore is invested in these simple plants, also known as “pot marigold,” and the blooms Shakespeare had in mind when he spoke of marigolds. The Old English called them golds and ruddes. One interesting bit of lore is that calendula was used to keep a lover faithful. All one had to do was to dig up some soil where their lover had walked, and use that soil for planting calendula. From that day forward the lover would forever by faithful.

From Discovery Health:

“Calendula has a long history of use as a wound-healing and skin-soothing botanical. This lovely marigold-like flower (although called pot marigold, it is not a true marigold) is considered a vulnerary agent, a substance that promotes healing. Calendula also has anti-inflammatory and weak antimicrobial activity. It is most often used topically for lacerations, abrasions, and skin infections; less commonly, it is used internally to heal inflamed & infected mucous membranes.”

Interesting and informative site that sells Calendula Cream.

From The Tree of Knowledge: Add calendula to baths to win respect and admiration. Scatter under your bed for protection & prophetic dreams. Carry for justice in court.

An ancient herbalist states: “Golde is bitter in savour. Fayr and yellow in his flowur. Ye golde flowur is good to sene. It makyth ye syth bryth and clene.”

“It is said, only to look on marigolds will draw evil humours out of the head and strengthen the eyesight. The petals may also be ingested in a conserve of sugar to be taken during times of plague and pestilence, or dried and added to broths. And if you’ve been robbed, marigold will give you a vision of the thief. But it must be taken “only when the moon is in the sign of the Virgin and not when Jupiter is in the ascendant, for then the herb loses its virtue. And the gatherer, who must be out of deadly sin, must say three Pater Nosters and three Aves.”

***Royalty free images

Planting A Fairy Garden


If you lack whimsy and magic in your life, consider enticing fairies to your yard by including the plants they find irresistible.

Personally, I’ve always been a big fan of fairies and they are more than welcome in my garden.  I just hope the cats don’t get them, though I expect they’re clever enough to evade felines and nosy farm dogs. Perhaps they catch a ride with butterflies or bumblebees and soar to safety, or simply hide among the leaves and flowers.

Not too long ago, my youngest niece, Cailin, now seven, aspired to be a fairy when she grew up and often checked her back in the mirror for signs of  sprouting wings.  To her disappointment, none were forthcoming. She still believes ardently in fairies, though, and knows quite a lot about them.  I’ll pass on any questions you might have and share Cailin’s replies. She’s a highly imaginative child with lots of ideas to share.

But back to Fairy gardens, I found much useful information on planting one at this herbal site.   “Some herbs are associated with fairies, the most important one being thyme. In Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Titania, the fairy queen, sleeps in a bed of wild thyme growing on a bank.”

*I love thyme and have assorted varieties growing with more or less success in my garden (s) and am forever planting more. You can’t have too much thyme.

“Foxgloves are essential for fairy gardens. According to legend, fairies sleep in the bell-shaped flowers, and wear them as gloves. Other common names for the plant include fairy fingers, fairy thimbles, and fairy cap.”

But of course. I just have to get the darn plants to grow here again.

“The purple foxglove is a biennial. Its blooms range in color from white and cream to pink and purple. There may be attractive dark spots in the throats of the bell-shaped flowers. There are perennial foxgloves as well, including the yellow foxglove.

Foxgloves often self-sow and prefer cool weather. Those in warm climates may want to grow the quick-blooming variety, called ‘Foxy.’ This will produce flowers the very first year from seed.”

*But they are not nearly as stunning as the varieties you have to wait for.

Another herb that is essential in the fairy garden is saffron. Fairies are especially fond of this culinary herb/spice for flavoring cakes and dyeing cloth. Other recommended plants are rosemary and roses. Roses are much-loved by fairies for their beauty and fragrance.”

Clap if you believe in fairies~

tiny fairy baby

Early Spring in the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia


My nonfiction book about gardening and country life, Shenandoah Watercolors, a 2012 EPPIC eBOOK Finalist, is FREE at Amazon through the 8th, then free for prime holders–$2.99 for others.

Daughter Elise, my mom and I are hard at work on the print version of this book that includes lovely photographs of the valley and mountains taken by my talented family.  Stay tuned for breaking news on this unbelievably time-consuming project.  The print will also be for sale through Amazon.  At least, initially.

This winter has been exceptionally mild, especially in comparison to the past two that were horrific.  Here’s where I point out that I found a brown woolly bear caterpillar last fall with no black rings on it at all–the hard winter indicators–so knew the winter would be super mild.  Now we’re heading into an early spring which is lovely, but worrying.  We hope a hard freeze doesn’t zap everything being lured out too soon.  I’m featuring an excerpt taken from the March Chapter in Shenandoah Watercolors.  The book is divided into months.  These images are from last spring.

Daffodils,

That come before the swallow dares, and take

The winds of March with beauty.”

~ William Shakespeare

‘Tis the time of daffodils, swaying in golden reign as if in King Arthur’s court, brave and cheerful, no matter the weather. If I had to choose one flower to symbolize the essence of spring, it would be the faithful daffodil. Its unique sweetness exudes this most beautiful of seasons and has since I was a child.

Bright crocus are also favorites and take me back to Easter eggs hidden beneath their purple petals and the perfume of hyacinths waft the riches of ancient Persia. Is there any greater wealth than the scent of spring flowers? These are treasures all can share.

Commercials on television promote fabric softeners and carpet fresheners that promise the scent of spring meadows or fields of flowers, but how many people have any idea what a meadow really smells like, or anything else in Nature. Breathe the real smells whenever you can.~

The Old Order Mennonite woman up the road from us has her tidy garden neatly plowed and her peas in. Not long ago I saw little boys in long pants and hats and pigtailed girls in cotton dresses out planting potatoes. Elise and I seeded a small salad patch and mulched the age-old asparagus and rhubarb that push up along the garden wall. We spread crumbling manuery hay over the garden and pressed Dennis into tilling it, but we’re looking at a big plot of empty with a great deal of work ahead of us before it’s crowded with corn, beans, tomatoes, and pumpkin vines. We ordered red, blue and yellow heirloom potato tubers from a company located in Maine, but they haven’t come yet. A New Englander’s idea of spring planting may be June.

Today our neighbor’s clothesline is hung with a long row of clean wash flapping in the breeze. The pants range from men’s to boys and the hems of the dresses lengthen with the line, as though graded by size. Another Old Order woman farther up the road has such a long clothes line that it reaches from the house way up into the sky and out quite a ways. She must use a pulley to reel her laundry back in.

How good her clothes will smell caressed by the wind and sun, but I’m too lazy to do my laundry this way. I didn’t always have a dryer, though. I remember the numb fingers and stiff jeans and towels, also the sheets scented with that heavenly fragrance of earth and sky.~

*Daffodil and Lunaria

Old Order Mennonite neighbor’s wash line

“But he that dares not grasp the thorn Should never crave the rose.”~Anne Bronte


“The rose speaks of love silently, in a language known only to the heart.”

*Roses from my garden

“You are responsible, forever, for what you have tamed. You are responsible for your rose.” Antoine de Saint-Exupery

I’d rather have roses on my table than diamonds on my neck.  ~Emma Goldman

To be overcome by the fragrance of flowers is a delectable form of defeat.  ~Beverly Nichols

“A single rose can be my garden…a single friend, my world.”
“Perfumes are the feelings of flowers.”
 ~Heinrich HeineThe Hartz Journey
“Give me odorous at sunrise a garden of beautiful flowers where I can walk
undisturbed.”
“I perhaps owe having become a painter to flowers.”
“A profusion of pink roses bending ragged in the rain speaks to me of all gentleness and its enduring.”  ~The Collected Later Poems of William Carlos Williams
‘”People from a planet without flowers would think we must be mad with joy the whole time to have such things about us.”

A Perfect Summer’s Day In The Garden


“It’s the longest day of the year, one to bottle and take out when November is come and the day ends at 5:00. I will tip the bottle over and pour liquid sunlight all over the gray autumnal shadows as they seep over the hills and into the meadow…the scents too, new mown hay, lavender, attar of roses, and the gleeful chatter of birds.” ~ Beth Trissel, from my nonfiction book,  Shenandoah Watercolors

While the light was pure this morning, my talented art major daughter took some pictures of the garden.  This is of our double-flowered apricot hollyhocks.

“This morning glows like a green-gold sun drop and every blade of grass glistens in the light. The newly washed spires of larkspur stand tall to greet the day. Fellows on every side, yellow lilies, bright-eyed pansies, lavender candytuft, crimson yarrow, and white asters all sit up straighter as if answering an unspoken summons and shine. Is it magic or June in the Valley? Is there a difference? ” ~ Shenandoah Watercolors

“Several plants reign supreme because of Elise. ‘Magic flowers,’ yellow evening primrose, have taken over a generous quadrant at the edge of the vegetable garden. She rushes me out at twilight to view the wonder as they pop open, charged with fragrance. Hummingbird moths swoop in like little fairies to feed on the blossoms.

She doesn’t like the bats that also come. I love the nighthawks. Dill is also taking over because black swallowtail butterflies lay their eggs on its leaves and hatch into little caterpillars which she watches closely, puts some into jars and feeds until they make a chrysalis, then one day they emerge with wet crumpled wings and she releases them to the sky.

I feel a bit like those uncertain butterflies, taking those first tentative flights. “~ Shenandoah Watercolors

“The best place to seek God is in a garden.  You can dig for him there.”  ~George Bernard Shaw

“Brilliant yellow gold finches streaked across the garden today and landed on the fence beside the hollyhocks. I love these birds, one of my absolute favorites. In midsummer, when the sunflowers bloom, they gather in chattering clusters to feed on the seeds. Their wings flash in the sun as they suspend on flower heads and peck away, and meticulously open each seed. I’ve never heard such euphoric birds, continually exclaiming over their finds. They have a lot to say and do not keep secrets well.

If I were to confide in birds, it would not be them, or to crows, loudly proclaiming the latest gossip. Warblers are fairy creatures, but not silent fairies. Possibly to wolves––no. They howl. Frogs croak and gribbit. Turtles are quiet. Tell all to turtles, then. Box or painted ones. Snappers are treacherous and would as soon bite you as listen.” ~ Shenandoah Watercolors

“The larkspur is in full bloom, a sea of blue and pink spires rise above a mass of poppies. Delphinium is a more glorious shade of blue but I lost so many blooms to gusting winds and winter cold that I finally became discouraged with cultivating those beauties. And so I content myself with larkspur, simpler but a survivor as are so many of the old heirloom flowers. Someday I will be an heirloom. Maybe I already am. But there are not many people in this world like me as there are seedlings of larkspur. ” ~Shenandoah Watercolors

*Note, I recently took the plunge and planted more delphinium seedlings, so we shall see.  One must try and nurture that which we love.

“I’ve enough spare flowers to fill a meadow and make butterflies and bees giddy with delight, but who would tend them? Only the most ‘satisfactory’ plants could compete with the grass and weeds that would choke them out. How do wild flowers survive? Queen Ann’s lace, tiny red poppies, and blue chicory run free along our unruly roadsides. Orange day lilies too, but they are tough with gnarly roots.”~Shenandoah Watercolors 

“A sea of herbs and flowers continually change with the season. Some perennials are lost each winter and new ones are planted by Elise and me, others by the birds. I’ve a wild aster that blooms in late spring, covered with small white flowers. It’s very pretty really, although hard to contain. I like white flowers. They glow at dusk while all else fades. ” ~Shenandoah Watercolors

“Earth laughs in flowers.” ~Ralph Waldo Emerson

“I’m particularly drawn to the heirloom varieties and the English cottage garden look. Even with these fairly trouble free plants it still takes considerable effort to fight the weeds and curtail the extremely aggressive flowers.

Years ago, I met a gardener who referred to the varieties that take over the garden on their march to the sea as ‘highly successful.’  So are weeds. The beds I tend could never be called orderly and can best be described as a happy confusion of plants. And we’ve nothing to sit on outside, so one simply strolls about and then comes back indoors. And one works one’s tail off.”~ Shenandoah Watercolors

“My job? To tend this bit of earth, but mostly to savor and learn.”~

*Roman Chamomile and Evening Primrose

Shenandoah Watercolors is available at Amazon and Barnes & Noble~

“Every spring is the only spring-a perpetual astonishment.”~Ellis Peters


“Spring has returned.  The Earth is like a child that knows poems.” ~Rainer Maria Rilke

Awake, thou wintry earth –
Fling off thy sadness!
Fair vernal flowers, laugh forth
Your ancient gladness!
~Thomas Blackburn, “An Easter Hymn”

*The Shenandoah Valley of Virginia.  Photographs by my mom, Pat Churchman

“April is a promise that May is bound to keep.”  ~Hal Borland

“Where man sees but withered leaves,
God sees sweet flowers growing.”
~Albert Laighton

“And Spring arose on the garden fair,
Like the Spirit of Love felt everywhere;
And each flower and herb on Earth’s dark breast
rose from the dreams of its wintry rest.”
~Percy Bysshe Shelley, “The Sensitive Plant

*Virginia Bluebells in my garden, flowers given to me by my grandmother.

“I think that no matter how old or infirm I may become, I will always plant a large garden in the spring.  Who can resist the feelings of hope and joy that one gets from participating in nature’s rebirth?”  ~Edward Giobbi

“The sun was warm but the wind was chill.
You know how it is with an April day.”
~Robert Frost

*Poppies and iris in the garden.

“April hath put a spirit of youth in everything.”  ~William Shakespeare

“Yesterday the twig was brown and bare;
To-day the glint of green is there;
Tomorrow will be leaflets spare;
I know no thing so wondrous fair,
No miracle so strangely rare.
I wonder what will next be there!”
~L.H. Bailey

“If I had my life to live over, I would start barefoot earlier in the spring and stay that way later in the fall.”  ~Nadine Stair

*Country Lane in the valley.

“Spring in verses,
Verses in spring.”
~Violet Gartenlicht

“Now every field is clothed with grass, and every tree with leaves; now the woods put forth their blossoms, and the year assumes its gay attire.”  ~Virgil

*A country roadside not far from our farm.

“The day the Lord created hope was probably the same day he created Spring.”
~Bern Williams

“Spring is when life’s alive in everything.”
~Christina Rossetti

“The year’s at the spring,
And day’s at the morn;
Morning’s at seven;
The hill-side’s dew-pearl’d;
The lark’s on the wing;
The snail’s on the thorn;
God’s in His heaven–
All’s right with the world!”
~Robert Browning

*My parent’s yard.

“A little Madness in the Spring
Is wholesome even for the King.”
~Emily Dickinson

“Spring unlocks the flowers to paint the laughing soil.”
~Bishop Reginald Heber

“I wandered lonely as a cloud
That floats on high o’er vales and hills,
When all at once I saw a crowd,
A host, of golden daffodils.”
~William Wordsworth

A Host of Golden Daffodils


A wonderful childhood memory of mine is arriving home after church one Sunday to find a clump of yellow daffodils, beaded with rain,  blooming beside the back door.  New flowers to me because I’d spent my early years in Taiwan where my parents both taught English.  We had a banana tree there, but no daffodils.   Rushing to the flowers in delight, I buried my face in the moist petals and breathed in the essence of spring.  To this day, nothing says spring to me like the fragrance of a simple  daffodil.

“The flowers of late winter and early spring occupy places in our hearts well out of proportion to their size.” ~Gertrude S. Wister  *I totally get this quote 🙂

I wandered lonely as a cloud
That floats on high o’er vales and hills,
When all at once I saw a crowd,
A host, of golden daffodils;
Beside the lake, beneath the trees,
Fluttering and dancing in the breeze. ” ~ William Wordsworth

“Daffodils that come before the swallow dares, and take the winds of March with beauty.” ~ Shakespeare

“It is daffodil time, so the robins all cry, For the sun’s a big daffodil up in the sky, And when down the midnight the owl call “to-whoo”! Why, then the round moon is a daffodil too; Now sheer to the bough-tops the sap starts to climb, So, merry my masters, it’s daffodil time.”

~ Clinton Scollard

“A thing of beauty is a joy forever.

Its loveliness increases. It will never

Pass into nothingness….Such the sun, the moon.

Trees old and young; sprouting a shady boon For simple sheep; such are daffodils With the green world they live in.”  ~John Keats

“Flowers have spoken to me more than I can tell in written words.  They are the hieroglyphics of angels, loved by all men for the beauty of their character, though few can decipher even fragments of their meaning.” ~ Lydia M. Child

“It is not raining rain to me,

It’s raining daffodils;

In every dimpled drop I see

Wild flowers on the hill.” ~ Robert Loveman


“If you’ve never been thrilled to the very edges of your soul by a flower in spring bloom, maybe your soul has never been in bloom.”  ~Terri Guilleme
ts

*My tiny pom-poo and faithful friend Sadie Sue.