Cinderella Lied


According to my four-year old granddaughter Emma.  I’ve never heard that take  before.  But she’s an unusual little girl.  So I’m in my writing cave–the couch with my laptop and fur babies–when Emma appears, as she does when weary of being on the farm with her adored father.  No, I didn’t want to go outside and swing, or pick flowers, or dig in the dirt.  A gusty wind blew and dark clouds were gathering.  And we heard the ominous rumbles of thunder.

To avoid a session of Wonder Pets— that darn song stays in my head for hours, or worse, Dora the Explorer, I suggested a much neglected favorite to entertain while I worked on edits, Disney’s Cinderella.  A film I first saw when I was a child.  This agreed to and a snack provided, we settled in, as much as one can with Emma.

Rapt silence for an extended length of time and then, “Cinderella lied.”

This gained my immediate attention. “What?”

“She said she wasn’t going to the ball and she went.”

“But Cinderella only said she wasn’t going after the wicked stepmother heaped so much work on her that she didn’t have time to make her dress, but then her little mice friends made one so she changed her mind.”

“Is changing your mind like lying?”

The vagaries of truth is a frequent topic of conversation as she tries to fathom the difference between harmless pretend and willful tale-telling, plus, plus.  I’ve decided this earnest child takes after the Puritan side of the family.

Emma also pointed out that Cinderella didn’t fess up to being at the ball after she’d gone.  Exasperated, I said she would’ve been beaten with sticks and shut up in her room.  And some things are best left unsaid.

A blank look.  I also got a blank look when in Cinderella’s defense I reminded Emma that they made her do all the dishes and cleaning and cooking and then remembered how hard her mother works.  So, no biggie there.  Emma was not accepting excuses.

But she did like the shoes.  And the fairy Godmother.  She could definitely find a use for one of those and made inquiries.  But Cinderella?  What a whiner.  Apparently she should have asserted herself, made the dress, and gone to the ball.  The prince didn’t seem to impress Emma one way or the other.  Not the sharpest knife in the drawer but a good dancer.  And she liked his castle.

Women have married for less.

*Next up, Emma on musicals.  “Why do they keep on singing?”

47 responses to “Cinderella Lied

  1. That was so cute! Emma sounds like a true heroine!

    Like

  2. That was precious, Beth. Spoken like a true four year old.

    Like

  3. LOL…from the mouth of babes! Loved it 🙂

    Like

  4. Beth,
    This is priceless! What a precocious child you have there. I wish I could get my grandboys interested in watching Cinderella. They refuse, always telling me it’s a girl movie:-)

    Like

  5. I’m happy to say both my daughters thought Cindy was a floor-mat too. They think she should’ve left the step mother, gotten a job or went to college and stop worrying about a “prince” coming to save the world. Made me proud!

    Like

  6. What an introspective child! I have to agree, she made some good arguments, Beth. 🙂

    Like

  7. LOL! Emma’s going to be a VERY sharp reviewer or movie critic when she grows up. Of course, on the other hand, she’d make a pretty wicked judge too!! 😉

    Like

    • Yes, and the funny thing is she asked me what story I was working on and I told her it was kind of like Cinderella. Boy meets girl and they have problems. Not impressed. 🙂

      Like

  8. LOL How cute and insightful she is. I can tell she is a wise child already.

    Like

  9. I think children can be much more realistic these days, and don’t chew over oddities like I used to as a child in case I offended someone!

    Like

  10. LOL, Beth! Out of the mouth of babes! Haven’t seen Cinderella since my boys were very young and they soon lost interest in it. Boys don’t usually talk while viewing movies anyway, so it’s interesting to see a little girl’s take on the fairy tale.

    Like

  11. Cute perspective, Beth. Just goes to show how things we say and do may be taken differently than the original intent in which it was done.

    Like

  12. Absolutely awesome – but she loved the shoes!!! lol

    Like

  13. Beth, your Emma is adorable. She knows how to speak her own mind. Just my little Madelyn, who asked me to give her my recipe for the macaronis she likes. When I said, “I’ll write it for you when you’ll learn to read.” Madelyn said, “No I want it now. I can remember it and tell Mommy how to cook it for me.” I’ve seen Cinderella and similar more times than I can count in the last few yeras.

    Like

  14. Ooohh, a thinker! She doesn’t just accept things at face value. You’re in for some very interesting and thought provoking conversations, it sounds like!

    Like

  15. Out of the mouth’s of babes. Reminds me of that Bill Cosby show. LOL

    Like

  16. I loved that! So sweet and true. What’s her take on Sleeping Beauty? 🙂

    Like

  17. Wow, you’ve got some little lady, there. I’m with you, Beth, on defending Cindy, but it’s terrific to hear another opinion and one from somebody who’s ideas still aren’t influenced by the views of the rest of the world. She’s going to be a brilliant, insightful woman when she grows up (actually, she seems to be more than halfway there already). Lovely post.

    Like

  18. “Cinderella Lied” sounds like a good sequel. You know, one of those take offs on the old classics. I think you might have something there.

    Like

  19. What a smart and independent granddaughter you have. Not to mention honest! Cinderella was a bit mousy and she didn’t have the guts to stand up for herself. I suggest you let her see EVER AFTER with Drew Barrymore. Now, there’s a Cinderella your granddaughter could respect….plus…it’s one of my all time favorite movies. Love Dougray Scott! And Drew.

    Like

  20. I love Emma. I have an Emma. When I took our youngest to kindergarten under protest at wearing a costume, she put her foot down at being in the parade – “silly people walking down the street lookin’ dumb”. From there it went down hill over the years. She is just now 32 and still pushes water up hill, but you know what – we wouldn’t trade her for the world…a world that is always full of the unexpected and delight. We never know what to expect and love her dearly. It took me 8 1/2 years to get pregnant with her and we’ve always known we waited for the best.

    Like

  21. I have to stay up late at night if I don’t want to watch Nick Jr and the cartoons you mentioned. Worst of all is the Fresh Beat Band. A bunch of teens acting like young kids.

    Ray

    Like

  22. Hi Beth! I enjoyed your post! I always loved fairy tales, and Cinderella no less than others. But a few years ago, when I watched my daughter (who was no more than two or three at the time) stare starry-eyed at Cinderella marrying the prince, it really came home to me that this movie represents quite a lot of old-fashioned morals in which I no longer believe and which I’d rather not pass on to my kids. I wonder where the line is drawn between entertainment for pure enjoyment and entertainment which could also intended as an educational tool. Or even if such a line can be drawn. Your post inspired a blog post of my own. http://www.lilcornerofjoy.blogspot.com

    Like

  23. Loved it! And I’m with your granddaughter, that tale needs some freshening up. Maybe she’ll write the new version!

    Like

  24. It is true, the Cinderella that appeared in Disney’s classic, so many years ago, does not seem too appealing to our modern-day darlings. To them and if I must speak the ‘truth” to me as well, she is a doormat, poor girl. I say, “Don’t let those imbecile stepsisters and rude, uncaring stepmother ruin your life. And don’t wait around for Prince Charming to make your life better. Go after your dreams and buy your own castle.” That’s how i see it.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s